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Urban Port

6 June 2013

Calais (France) incorporates water transport into its public transport network

Source : Le Marin

6 June 2013

Rotterdam – Hô-Chi-Minh-City: cooperation agreement on climate change, particularly rising sea-levels

Source : Cities Today

5 June 2013

Toronto: landscape architecture for tomorrow’s city

Toronto’s population continues to grow and high rise buildings are springing up all over the city. To counteract this, the authorities are implementing a global strategy to preserve the quality of life. Landscape architecture is at the heart of this strategy, particularly along the waterfront.
Source : Huffington Post

5 June 2013

London: refurbishment of the marina in the three basins of St Katherine’s Docks

Source : Medberths

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. “

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Debate between leaders of the cruise ship industry and port-cities

AIVP followed with much interest the work of the conference organised by the Cruise Europe association, which held a meeting for its members in Le Havre on 23, 24 and 25 April this year. More than one hundred delegates involved in the development of the cruise ship business in port-cities, from a score of countries in Northern and Western Europe, took part in the conference.The port-city as an economic adjustment variable?
The cruise operators represented among the speakers (Holland America Line, Celebrity, Carnival, AIDA…) testified to the good health of the cruise market in Northern and Western Europe, while stressing the difficulty of ensuring that the business remains profitable economically. The cost of fuel and port costs were mentioned to explain this apparently paradoxical situation. The direct and indirect costs associated with calls at European ports were once again vigorously denounced by the lines’ representatives. The question of the balance sought between passenger expectations of an attractive and comfortable programme of calls on the one hand, and the companies’ demand for maximum profitability on the other, is necessarily delicate. In the search for this financial balance, companies see the choice of the port-cities at which they call as an adjustment variable. These port-cities therefore have a strong incentive to offer conditions for ship calls which meet the companies’ strategic demands. For a start, every port-city must know how to negotiate a win-win partnership, while understanding that it is more and more difficult to make the most of the profits to be earned from their geographical situation in a context of strong competition between ports which are ever better equipped for cruise ship calls.
In search of authenticity
The structure of each cruise and, naturally, the question of the calls and the excursions available, were central issues in the debates. To reduce the variable costs of their operations, the companies look for new circuits which are linear rather than loops; passengers therefore embark and disembark at different ports. Moreover, slow steaming, already extensively used by cargo vessels, is an increasingly common practice among cruise ship operators. Steaming speeds at sea have been falling steadily for several years to save fuel. As a result of this, ports of call cannot be too far apart in order to optimise passage time, which is the least expensive for the operator and can generate the best profits for companies through consumption of the services offered on board. In the port of call, the companies are careful to ensure that the terminal is close to the city centre, and that good road infrastructure exists for day excursions. Failing that, the offer of launches (free of course!) by local players is naturally appreciated.

The quality of the excursions offered, the level of on-shore reception and the interest of each port of call contribute to the reputation and success of the cruise, and therefore of the company. For the cruise ship operator, novelty, authenticity and exclusivity are values which are sure to guarantee a satisfying “repeater” rate among passengers, who are also encouraged to recount their “experience” on the internet and social networks. For European cruises, this indirect marketing strategy is proving particularly successful.
Conclusions
It is hard to say who is winning this game in which port-cities and cruise ship companies try not to be first to blink. The strong market dynamic is sufficient to keep everybody happy for the moment: the companies who are permanently refining their economic model, the port-cities who are polishing their images and can expect substantial economic benefits, and finally the passengers, who every day are offered more, at more competitive prices. However the equilibrium is fragile and the importance of the role played by the industry’s professionals in each port of call should be stressed. In a few years, they have become essential points of contact for the companies and the first to encourage the formation of local “cruise clubs”. A great advantage of meetings like this is that it brings them together and allows them refine the strategies of their own port-cities.

See also:
http://www.cruise-europe.org/

4 June 2013

Kengo Kuma: the Japanese architect builds culture into the old river port at Besançon (France)

The recently inaugurated “City of the Arts” at Besançon brings together the FRAC (Regional Fund for Contemporary Art), located in an old brick-built warehouse, with a new building housing the Music Conservatory. The public esplanade serves the whole ensemble, creating a link between city, art and the river.
Source : Kengo Kuma And Associates ; Le Moniteur

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

Citizen Port

22 November 2017

Almeria: The Puerto-Ciudad project masterplan to be submitted to a public consultation in January 2018

The Mayor of Almeria has highlighted the importance of having all of the authorities concerned on board with the project, so that the city-port project ceases to be merely a discussion of good intentions, and starts to take practical shape in the form of tangible documents and real events open to all.

Full article: www3.aytoalmeria.es

22 November 2017

Climate change and sustainable development: commissioners at the Port of Seattle spring into action

Full article: Port of Seattle

22 November 2017

AEB Amsterdam, the Port , Senfal and Energy eXchange Enablers will supply sustainable cold ironing power to river cruise boats and other vessels using inland waterways

Full article: Port of Amsterdam

20 November 2017

Trieste: conference on the circular economy and competitiveness in port cities

Organised by AREA Science and the Port of Trieste, the meeting was an opportunity for experts to discuss innovative solutions and models made possible by the circular economy. They debated the positive impacts and added value generated in terms of employment for a port city territory like Trieste.

Full article: Porto of TriesteAREA + Il Nautilus + Messagero Marittimo

 

20 November 2017

DP World has installed 88,000 solar panels in Jebel Ali and Port Rashid on the roofs of buildings, car parks and warehouses.

Full article: https://www.albawaba.com

20 November 2017

The port and University of Huelva join forces to promote innovation and employment

Full article: http://elvigia.com

20 November 2017

The Port of Seville and the Andalusian Foundation for industrial heritage award a prize for alfresco painting of industrial port heritage

Full article: 20 Minutos

15 November 2017

The Port of Long Beach is organising public workshops to adjust its funding programmes

To obtain maximum information and adapt the criteria for subsidies under the Community Grants Program, the Port is offering to work with its neighbours and those most impacted by port operations. The programme funds projects designed to improve the health and quality of life of local residents, in particular.

Full article: See the program fact sheet here Port of Long Beach + http://mailchi.mp

15 November 2017

The Port of San Diego and San Diego Gas & Electric are working on an energy management plan to promote competitiveness and meet Climate action targets

Full article: Port of San Diego

15 November 2017

An environmental initiative between four global port operators to encourage 7,500 port workers to adopt green practices.

Full article: http://www.handyshippingguide.com

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Enterprise-driver Port

22 November 2017

Spain: the Court of Auditors expresses reservations on the multiplication of port investments.

The Court blames ports for not carrying out realistic studies of the real demand underlying every new infrastructure work. It demands the definition of a clearer national strategy and control mechanisms. The response to market demands must be analysed more deeply from a national perspective and not port by port. The Court does not recognise a direct correlation between infrastructure expenditure and efficiency gains.

Full article: El Vigia

22 November 2017

Occitania Region launches the extension of Port-la-Nouvelle and its platform dedicated to floating wind turbines.

Full article: Le Marin / France 3

22 November 2017

Abu Dhabi Ports fully contributes to the country’s food safety by developing dedicated port areas and industrial clusters

Full article: Port Technology

22 November 2017

The port of Tallinn goes onto the stock market to give confidence to investors and strengthen the local economy.

Full article: Port Technology

22 November 2017

Hamburg: the port and the local economy are suffering increasingly from failure to deepen the Elbe.

Full article: Journal of Commerce

20 November 2017

The impact of the Belt and Road initiative on China’s cruise industry

The Belt and Road initiative is a new vision and represents a new direction for the country’s tourist development. Covering 80% of the world’s cultural heritage sites, over 60 countries and 4 .4 billion people, the initiative will generate major growth for the Chinese cruise tourism economy.

Full article: China.org

20 November 2017

Regulations for the clean air action plan at the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles is becoming standard for the US port industry

Full article: JOC

15 November 2017

McKinsey’s 50-year vision for container transport: growth, gigantism, concentration, digitalisation. Is this credible?

Full article: McKinsey&Company

15 November 2017

Egypt, Suez Canal: DP World will develop a new industrial and residential area: 20 km2, 500.000 habitants and 400.000 jobs

Full article: Gulf Business

15 November 2017

Logistics: automation requires new professional profiles even if 80% of tasks are still being done manually.

Full article: El Vigia

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