Live

Urban Port

10 June 2013

Cherbourg: heat pump installed in the port’s commercial basin supplies 1,300 homes

Source : Le Monde

6 June 2013

Strasbourg: the old port warehouse will be built up three storeys higher!

Work is in progress on the Seegmuller warehouse. The addition of a rectangular space on three levels proposed by architects Georges Heintz and Anne-Sophie Kehr will allow the development of part of the planned residential construction. A less space-greedy solution for the programme on the “Malraux Peninsula”.
Source : Bâti Actu (+ images)

 

6 June 2013

Stockholm: a pilot city for green growth

With more than forty years’ commitment to environmental issues, Stockholm is aiming at Zero fossil fuel consumption by 2050. Today it is a model for the “Green Economy”, particularly through achievements in two port-city sectors: the Hammerby eco-district and the Royal Seaport. Detailed report
Source : City of Stockholm

 

6 June 2013

Calais (France) incorporates water transport into its public transport network

Source : Le Marin

6 June 2013

Rotterdam – Hô-Chi-Minh-City: cooperation agreement on climate change, particularly rising sea-levels

Source : Cities Today

5 June 2013

Toronto: landscape architecture for tomorrow’s city

Toronto’s population continues to grow and high rise buildings are springing up all over the city. To counteract this, the authorities are implementing a global strategy to preserve the quality of life. Landscape architecture is at the heart of this strategy, particularly along the waterfront.
Source : Huffington Post

5 June 2013

London: refurbishment of the marina in the three basins of St Katherine’s Docks

Source : Medberths

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. “

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Debate between leaders of the cruise ship industry and port-cities

AIVP followed with much interest the work of the conference organised by the Cruise Europe association, which held a meeting for its members in Le Havre on 23, 24 and 25 April this year. More than one hundred delegates involved in the development of the cruise ship business in port-cities, from a score of countries in Northern and Western Europe, took part in the conference.The port-city as an economic adjustment variable?
The cruise operators represented among the speakers (Holland America Line, Celebrity, Carnival, AIDA…) testified to the good health of the cruise market in Northern and Western Europe, while stressing the difficulty of ensuring that the business remains profitable economically. The cost of fuel and port costs were mentioned to explain this apparently paradoxical situation. The direct and indirect costs associated with calls at European ports were once again vigorously denounced by the lines’ representatives. The question of the balance sought between passenger expectations of an attractive and comfortable programme of calls on the one hand, and the companies’ demand for maximum profitability on the other, is necessarily delicate. In the search for this financial balance, companies see the choice of the port-cities at which they call as an adjustment variable. These port-cities therefore have a strong incentive to offer conditions for ship calls which meet the companies’ strategic demands. For a start, every port-city must know how to negotiate a win-win partnership, while understanding that it is more and more difficult to make the most of the profits to be earned from their geographical situation in a context of strong competition between ports which are ever better equipped for cruise ship calls.
In search of authenticity
The structure of each cruise and, naturally, the question of the calls and the excursions available, were central issues in the debates. To reduce the variable costs of their operations, the companies look for new circuits which are linear rather than loops; passengers therefore embark and disembark at different ports. Moreover, slow steaming, already extensively used by cargo vessels, is an increasingly common practice among cruise ship operators. Steaming speeds at sea have been falling steadily for several years to save fuel. As a result of this, ports of call cannot be too far apart in order to optimise passage time, which is the least expensive for the operator and can generate the best profits for companies through consumption of the services offered on board. In the port of call, the companies are careful to ensure that the terminal is close to the city centre, and that good road infrastructure exists for day excursions. Failing that, the offer of launches (free of course!) by local players is naturally appreciated.

The quality of the excursions offered, the level of on-shore reception and the interest of each port of call contribute to the reputation and success of the cruise, and therefore of the company. For the cruise ship operator, novelty, authenticity and exclusivity are values which are sure to guarantee a satisfying “repeater” rate among passengers, who are also encouraged to recount their “experience” on the internet and social networks. For European cruises, this indirect marketing strategy is proving particularly successful.
Conclusions
It is hard to say who is winning this game in which port-cities and cruise ship companies try not to be first to blink. The strong market dynamic is sufficient to keep everybody happy for the moment: the companies who are permanently refining their economic model, the port-cities who are polishing their images and can expect substantial economic benefits, and finally the passengers, who every day are offered more, at more competitive prices. However the equilibrium is fragile and the importance of the role played by the industry’s professionals in each port of call should be stressed. In a few years, they have become essential points of contact for the companies and the first to encourage the formation of local “cruise clubs”. A great advantage of meetings like this is that it brings them together and allows them refine the strategies of their own port-cities.

See also:
http://www.cruise-europe.org/

Citizen Port

17 January 2018

A new museum for the Port and City of Aviles with more than 220 m2 dedicated to port history

Full article: Elcomercio

17 January 2018

Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) requests ports to reduce their emissions as a result of significant air pollution

Full article: Green 4 Sea

17 January 2018

The RP-PSA Experiential Laboratory has been launched in Singapore. It is a high technology simulator in which students will be able to develop their skills

Full article: Port Technology

15 January 2018

The adoption of a strategy to improve air quality now a priority for the Port of London

Full article: Tidal Thames

15 January 2018

With Euros 1.4 million of investment, the port of Antwerp is hoping to bring a halt to congestion caused by heavy goods traffic, aiming to cut the number of journeys by 250,000.

Full article: Constructions Cayola

15 January 2018

The Port of Auckland draws on a recent study to introduce cold ironing facilities for cruise ships and cut greenhouse gas emissions by 31%.

Full article: Cruise Industry

10 January 2018

MTCC- Network: a global network of centres of excellence in marine technology has been official launched at the headquarters of the IMO

The directors of the five cooperation centres have signed a MoA to create the network with centres in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Pacific. Their mission is to promote new technologies to improve energy efficiency and reduce harmful emissions from ships.

Full article: Maritime Executive + Port Calls

10 January 2018

Events and entertainments for all ages: a guide to the autonomous port of Strasbourg

Full article: Video

10 January 2018

Port fees in Helsinki favour operators who make efforts to reduce their environmental footprint

Full article: Greenport + Port of Helsinki

8 January 2018

Cruise ships are becoming more and more high-tech: five technological trends explained

Full article: Marinelink

12345124125

Enterprise-driver Port

17 January 2018

Energy transition: Is offshore electricity the power source of the future for many north European ports?

Full article: World Cargo News

17 January 2018

Based on the model of Malaysia or Thailand, transport corridors can be a great asset for African port cities.

Full article: Ports & Ships

17 January 2018

Montreal: in 2018, the port will use predictive analysis to control access to its terminals in a self-perfecting system.

Full article: Journal of Commerce

17 January 2018

Data management accounts for 20% of shipping costs. Maersk and IBM hope to reduce these costs with Blockchain.

Full article: Port Technology / Business Time

17 January 2018

Ship-breaking industries: After Le Havre, Bordeaux and Brest, Le Trait, in the Seine Valley, is the 4th French site to gain certification.

Full article: Le Marin

15 January 2018

Marseille: Quechen Silicon Chemical announces plans for a silica production plant to be integrated into the PIICTO platform

The €100 million industrial investment by the world’s third largest silica manufacturer will help to create 130 jobs. The project represents recognition for the port’s ability to provide land, energy, good international links and an industrial ecology platform that allows the operators present to pool resources and fluids.

Full article: Le Marin / Marseille Port (pdf)

15 January 2018

Dutch firm Port Liner announces plans to launch fully-electric barges with capacity for 280 containers by autumn 2018.

Full article: Electrek

15 January 2018

French Guyana: the maritime and port sectors expect to play leading roles in the blue economy

Full article: Grand Port Maritime Guyane

15 January 2018

Australia: Newcastle, one of the world’s biggest coal ports, starts to mutate to prepare for a future with less coal.

Full article: Splash 24/7

15 January 2018

South Korea expects to have 3,000 ha of industrial-logistical zones to support its ports by 2030

Full article: Yonhap News

12345169170