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Urban Port

5 June 2013

London: refurbishment of the marina in the three basins of St Katherine’s Docks

Source : Medberths

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. “

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Debate between leaders of the cruise ship industry and port-cities

AIVP followed with much interest the work of the conference organised by the Cruise Europe association, which held a meeting for its members in Le Havre on 23, 24 and 25 April this year. More than one hundred delegates involved in the development of the cruise ship business in port-cities, from a score of countries in Northern and Western Europe, took part in the conference.The port-city as an economic adjustment variable?
The cruise operators represented among the speakers (Holland America Line, Celebrity, Carnival, AIDA…) testified to the good health of the cruise market in Northern and Western Europe, while stressing the difficulty of ensuring that the business remains profitable economically. The cost of fuel and port costs were mentioned to explain this apparently paradoxical situation. The direct and indirect costs associated with calls at European ports were once again vigorously denounced by the lines’ representatives. The question of the balance sought between passenger expectations of an attractive and comfortable programme of calls on the one hand, and the companies’ demand for maximum profitability on the other, is necessarily delicate. In the search for this financial balance, companies see the choice of the port-cities at which they call as an adjustment variable. These port-cities therefore have a strong incentive to offer conditions for ship calls which meet the companies’ strategic demands. For a start, every port-city must know how to negotiate a win-win partnership, while understanding that it is more and more difficult to make the most of the profits to be earned from their geographical situation in a context of strong competition between ports which are ever better equipped for cruise ship calls.
In search of authenticity
The structure of each cruise and, naturally, the question of the calls and the excursions available, were central issues in the debates. To reduce the variable costs of their operations, the companies look for new circuits which are linear rather than loops; passengers therefore embark and disembark at different ports. Moreover, slow steaming, already extensively used by cargo vessels, is an increasingly common practice among cruise ship operators. Steaming speeds at sea have been falling steadily for several years to save fuel. As a result of this, ports of call cannot be too far apart in order to optimise passage time, which is the least expensive for the operator and can generate the best profits for companies through consumption of the services offered on board. In the port of call, the companies are careful to ensure that the terminal is close to the city centre, and that good road infrastructure exists for day excursions. Failing that, the offer of launches (free of course!) by local players is naturally appreciated.

The quality of the excursions offered, the level of on-shore reception and the interest of each port of call contribute to the reputation and success of the cruise, and therefore of the company. For the cruise ship operator, novelty, authenticity and exclusivity are values which are sure to guarantee a satisfying “repeater” rate among passengers, who are also encouraged to recount their “experience” on the internet and social networks. For European cruises, this indirect marketing strategy is proving particularly successful.
Conclusions
It is hard to say who is winning this game in which port-cities and cruise ship companies try not to be first to blink. The strong market dynamic is sufficient to keep everybody happy for the moment: the companies who are permanently refining their economic model, the port-cities who are polishing their images and can expect substantial economic benefits, and finally the passengers, who every day are offered more, at more competitive prices. However the equilibrium is fragile and the importance of the role played by the industry’s professionals in each port of call should be stressed. In a few years, they have become essential points of contact for the companies and the first to encourage the formation of local “cruise clubs”. A great advantage of meetings like this is that it brings them together and allows them refine the strategies of their own port-cities.

See also:
http://www.cruise-europe.org/

4 June 2013

Kengo Kuma: the Japanese architect builds culture into the old river port at Besançon (France)

The recently inaugurated “City of the Arts” at Besançon brings together the FRAC (Regional Fund for Contemporary Art), located in an old brick-built warehouse, with a new building housing the Music Conservatory. The public esplanade serves the whole ensemble, creating a link between city, art and the river.
Source : Kengo Kuma And Associates ; Le Moniteur

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica

31 May 2013

Copenhague: inicio de las obras para la construcción del Centro Nacional de Arquitectura diseñado por Rem Koolhass

El Centro se implantará en el emplazamiento de una antigua cervecería donde también se prevén oficinas y viviendas. Dicho centro permitirá vincular el centro de la ciudad con el frente costero histórico y el barrio cultural de Slotsholmen.
Source : OMA ; Cyber Archi

31 May 2013

Alotau in Papua-New Guinea preparing to receive cruise ship calls

The Port of Alotau will be restructured by PNG Ports Corporation Limited (PNGPCL) between now and October to enable it to receive the first cruise ships operated by Carnival Australia, one of the biggest operators in the Australian market. This will make it the biggest cruise ship port in the country.
Source: PNG Ports Corporation

Citizen Port

19 February 2018

Tauranga (New Zealand): how can a sustainable cruise tourism policy be implemented?

The tourism development agency is currently questioning the growing number of cruise ship passengers arriving in their territory. How can they maintain a balance while responding to the expectations of both the cruise ship passengers and the local population? To inform her decision, the agency’s director considers that much more precise knowledge of the data on visitor arrivals and the associated financial flows is required.

Full article: Sunlive

19 February 2018

The Port of Bordeaux launches PowerPort BOX: a mobile power supply module for river vessels

Full article: Mer et Marine

19 February 2018

Port of San Diego terminals invest in smart technologies to fight pollution

Full article: Greenport

14 February 2018

Hong Kong: being a leading maritime metropolis still requires a prosperous port

Full article: China Daily

14 February 2018

The wahoo effect plays a role for port employees. We look at the Kalmar example

Full article: Kalmar Global

14 February 2018

Lorient: winter port circuits to learn about the region’s maritime economic identity

Full article: CCSTI

12 February 2018

France: what does the future hold for the sea and the coastline?

The State has set up a participative platform for members of the public to obtain information and submit their views on the future vision proposed for each of the country’s coastlines, in order to ensure the right ecological balance and maximise economic and social benefits from the sea and coast.

Full article: Mer Littoral + Magazine Environnement

12 February 2018

Valparaíso: the port launches the fourth edition of “Vive Muelle Prat”, with festive activities for all the family

Full article: Portal Portuario

12 February 2018

The Port of La Rochelle launches a consultation on its “Port Horizon 2025” development project

Full article: Port of La Rochelle

7 February 2018

Thanks to a long-term societal integration policy, the Dutch people now love the port of Rotterdam!

Full article: Port of Rotterdam

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Enterprise-driver Port

19 February 2018

In a fast-changing economy, what does the future hold for the maritime industry?

In a recent publication, Danish Ship Finance offers some answers based on a macro-economic analysis. The report touches on issues including purchasing power and impact on maritime trade, new technologies and social impacts, urbanisation and industrial change. Meanwhile, British Ports Association is launching a more comprehensive study to predict the shape of the port environment in 2050. Will there be a larger number of smaller ships visiting more ports?

Full article: Danish Ship Finance / British Ports Association

19 February 2018

China acquires a 770 km2 stretch of maritime space in the Wanshan archipelago for testing autonomous ships.

Full article: Le Marin

19 February 2018

Professor Rodrigue gives his thoughts on the organisation of container traffic on the Saint Lawrence between Quebec and Montreal.

Full article: Jean-Paul Rodrigue – Linkedin

19 February 2018

To improve its urban logistics, IKEA will take over 50,000 m2 of a dual-level warehouse at the Port of Gennevilliers

Full article: Haropa Ports de Paris Seine Normandie

19 February 2018

Faced with queues at the terminal, the port of Long Beach refines its predictive analytics and considers a “peel pile” stacking system to reduce truck turn times when collecting import containers.

Full article: World Cargo News

14 February 2018

Smart Port: Hamburg launches a platform to test 5G at an 8,000 hectare area of the port

One of the key aims will be to ensure infrastructures can be used more reliably and securely by boosting real-time management capabilities. The project will see Hamburg become one of the first test sites in Europe to confirm the protocols for 5G applications. Logistics is one of the sectors where the new technology, which combines both terrestrial and mobile network support, could provide much-needed flexibility.

Full article: Port of Hamburg

14 February 2018

By doubling its capacity over the next ten years, the Port of Savannah hopes to reinforce its role as a key economic growth engine for the State of Georgia

Full article: Splash 24/7 / Georgia Ports

14 February 2018

Dubai Ports invests in the development of interior logistics platforms in the Indian provinces of Jammu and Kashmir.

Full article: Business Standard

12 February 2018

The port of Hamilton set to pursue its industrial operations while continuously improving its integration into the urban fabric

For the port’s CEO, this strategy is vital. Space is scarce and redeveloping the port on its current site will be a priority for the local economy, although the strategy must not prevent urban development. Creating more green spaces and landscaping the port, while working in permanent consultation with local residents, is essential.

Full article: CBC

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