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Urban Port

6 June 2013

Rotterdam – Hô-Chi-Minh-City: cooperation agreement on climate change, particularly rising sea-levels

Source : Cities Today

5 June 2013

Toronto: landscape architecture for tomorrow’s city

Toronto’s population continues to grow and high rise buildings are springing up all over the city. To counteract this, the authorities are implementing a global strategy to preserve the quality of life. Landscape architecture is at the heart of this strategy, particularly along the waterfront.
Source : Huffington Post

5 June 2013

London: refurbishment of the marina in the three basins of St Katherine’s Docks

Source : Medberths

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. “

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Debate between leaders of the cruise ship industry and port-cities

AIVP followed with much interest the work of the conference organised by the Cruise Europe association, which held a meeting for its members in Le Havre on 23, 24 and 25 April this year. More than one hundred delegates involved in the development of the cruise ship business in port-cities, from a score of countries in Northern and Western Europe, took part in the conference.The port-city as an economic adjustment variable?
The cruise operators represented among the speakers (Holland America Line, Celebrity, Carnival, AIDA…) testified to the good health of the cruise market in Northern and Western Europe, while stressing the difficulty of ensuring that the business remains profitable economically. The cost of fuel and port costs were mentioned to explain this apparently paradoxical situation. The direct and indirect costs associated with calls at European ports were once again vigorously denounced by the lines’ representatives. The question of the balance sought between passenger expectations of an attractive and comfortable programme of calls on the one hand, and the companies’ demand for maximum profitability on the other, is necessarily delicate. In the search for this financial balance, companies see the choice of the port-cities at which they call as an adjustment variable. These port-cities therefore have a strong incentive to offer conditions for ship calls which meet the companies’ strategic demands. For a start, every port-city must know how to negotiate a win-win partnership, while understanding that it is more and more difficult to make the most of the profits to be earned from their geographical situation in a context of strong competition between ports which are ever better equipped for cruise ship calls.
In search of authenticity
The structure of each cruise and, naturally, the question of the calls and the excursions available, were central issues in the debates. To reduce the variable costs of their operations, the companies look for new circuits which are linear rather than loops; passengers therefore embark and disembark at different ports. Moreover, slow steaming, already extensively used by cargo vessels, is an increasingly common practice among cruise ship operators. Steaming speeds at sea have been falling steadily for several years to save fuel. As a result of this, ports of call cannot be too far apart in order to optimise passage time, which is the least expensive for the operator and can generate the best profits for companies through consumption of the services offered on board. In the port of call, the companies are careful to ensure that the terminal is close to the city centre, and that good road infrastructure exists for day excursions. Failing that, the offer of launches (free of course!) by local players is naturally appreciated.

The quality of the excursions offered, the level of on-shore reception and the interest of each port of call contribute to the reputation and success of the cruise, and therefore of the company. For the cruise ship operator, novelty, authenticity and exclusivity are values which are sure to guarantee a satisfying “repeater” rate among passengers, who are also encouraged to recount their “experience” on the internet and social networks. For European cruises, this indirect marketing strategy is proving particularly successful.
Conclusions
It is hard to say who is winning this game in which port-cities and cruise ship companies try not to be first to blink. The strong market dynamic is sufficient to keep everybody happy for the moment: the companies who are permanently refining their economic model, the port-cities who are polishing their images and can expect substantial economic benefits, and finally the passengers, who every day are offered more, at more competitive prices. However the equilibrium is fragile and the importance of the role played by the industry’s professionals in each port of call should be stressed. In a few years, they have become essential points of contact for the companies and the first to encourage the formation of local “cruise clubs”. A great advantage of meetings like this is that it brings them together and allows them refine the strategies of their own port-cities.

See also:
http://www.cruise-europe.org/

4 June 2013

Kengo Kuma: the Japanese architect builds culture into the old river port at Besançon (France)

The recently inaugurated “City of the Arts” at Besançon brings together the FRAC (Regional Fund for Contemporary Art), located in an old brick-built warehouse, with a new building housing the Music Conservatory. The public esplanade serves the whole ensemble, creating a link between city, art and the river.
Source : Kengo Kuma And Associates ; Le Moniteur

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica

Citizen Port

14 November 2018

Energy transition, community relations, human capital: three development priorities for the port of Antwerp.

For its Chief Executive, the port of Antwerp needs increasingly to become a business facilitator and a community builder. The port must take up the challenges of the future by fostering dialogue and acting with the community. Creating a working environment that promotes initiative-taking and respects the well-being of employees will also contribute, as will improving everyday mobility for commuters in the port zone.

Full article: ESPO

14 November 2018

The port of Vancouver is rewarded again for the consistency of its management practices with its sustainable development policy.

Full article: Port of Vancouver

14 November 2018

The Port de Southampton is speeding up the construction of cycle paths to improve links between home and work, thus reducing pollution.

Full article: Daily Echo

12 November 2018

Reducing emissions from maritime transport by 20% by 2050 raises economic and technological questions. Isemar tries to bring some elements of response.

Full article: Isemar

12 November 2018

Social network are increasingly at the core of the marketing strategies of cruise operators.

Full article: Port Economics

12 November 2018

The Port of Kiel acquires a power plant for cruise ships in order to cover the demand of 50% of calls by 2020.

Full article: World Cargo News

7 November 2018

Genoa: 5th meeting of the AIVP Port Center Network (PCN) Working Group

A reduced PCN working group meeting brought together around thirty people from Europe and Canada. The meeting was officially hosted by Porto Antico, the Port Authority and the City of Genoa. Over a day and a half, a series of presentations were given by local stakeholders, with opportunity for debate and discussion, sharing of ideas, and field trips including a visit to the Port Center which recently re-opened to the public, plus the Città dei Bambini, the Galata museum, and a research laboratory specialising in pioneering biomaterials.

Full article: Port Center by AIVP

7 November 2018

Shore power for cruise ships continues to be a debatable issue due to the high investment costs and relatively low use.

Full article: CruiseIndustry

7 November 2018

The French Parliament strengthens the polluter-pays principle for ship wastes management.

Full article: ESPO

5 November 2018

The Aix-Marseille-Provence Metropolitan Area and the CCI of Var have been chosen to host the “Hydrogène dans les Territoires” Days 2019

Full article: Cap Energie

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Enterprise-driver Port

14 November 2018

Increasingly strong ties between the actors involved in river traffic and sea ports force the former to review their strategies.

They face several challenges: preserving investment in the face of the responsiveness of the route, despite the fall in the availability of financing; becoming more closely integrated with global logistical systems; improving connections with other modes of transport; and finally, becoming engaged in local projects aimed at strengthening river services in urban areas, while sharing use of river banks which have become highly prized spaces.

Full article : ITF

14 November 2018

DP Word is giving Virgin Hyperloop a close race for the execution of a project to connect the Indian cities of Mumbai and Pune.

Full article: Port Technology

14 November 2018

Amsterdam: during the 2nd year of the Roboat project, scale models of autonomous ships have been validated. Next stage: a 1:2 scale prototype.

Full article: Cities Today

14 November 2018

New navigable routes will allow North East India to be served over Bangladeshi ports

Full article: Business Standart

14 November 2018

The Italian Government announces that the future of cruise ship calls at Venice should be decided within a few months at the latest.

Full article: The Meditelegraphh

12 November 2018

OECD: the power of alliances could prompt a rethink of port policies, especially in Europe.

The issue of maritime alliances is the focus of the latest report by the ITF, which shows that the concentration of container ship owners is currently impacting on quality and service. There is real pressure on terminal and port operators, whose development is partly funded by the public sector. The ITF is calling for competition law to be applied in full to shipping, port projects to be assessed on common principles and standards, and finally a rethink of national and supra-regional port policies.

Full article: ITF OCDE

 

12 November 2018

Canadian port policy: should the number of ports be reduced from 18, and territories be given more say in appointing their directors?

Full article: The Conversation

12 November 2018

70% of European trucking companies are convinced that there will be driverless trucks in 10 years. The same is the case for last mile freight.

Full article: El Vigia 1 / El Vigia 2

12 November 2018

Singapore invests 18 million SGD in a Centre of Excellence in Modelling for Next Generation Ports to optimise long term operation

Full article : Hellenic Shipping News

12 November 2018

By creating the largest green hydrogen cluster in Europe, the Port of Amsterdam wants to move towards a climate-neutral circular industry.

Full article: Port of Amsterdam

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