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Urban Port

7 August 2013

Rijeka: call for bids for “Delta and Port Baross area”

The Port and City of Rijeka have just launched an international competition for the redevelopment of the Delta and Port Baross areas. The object is to transform these port sectors into a new urban centre (Closing date: 22 October).
The project is an essential element of the “Rijeka Gateway Project”, about which we talked recently with the mayor of Rijeka, Mr. Vojko Obersnel. (See : AIVP case Study – Rijeka).

Source: Port of Rijeka, Tender ; Delta Competition

 

 

7 August 2013

The Port of Stockholm launches the Värtahamnen project. An opportunity for the city

The reconstruction of the Värtahamnen passenger port was launched in June. The new site and the passenger terminal, which will be more effective and environmentally friendly, should be opened in 2016. The land released will allow the city to build housing and office space in the city centre. It is an integral part of “Stockholm Royal Seaport”, a general redevelopment project.

Source : Ports of Stockholm Press Release ; The project (+ video) ; Stockholm Royal Seaport Project

 

7 August 2013

Bordeaux: a private maritime and naval museum and 220 housing units near the “Bassins à flot”

Source : Le Moniteur des travaux publics et du bâtiment

6 August 2013

Pingtan (China): museum and city will replace military activities and fishing

The Pingtan Art Museum, designed by MAD architects, will be the biggest private museum in Asia. It is at the heart of a more general urban redevelopment project for the island of Fujian, the Chinese island closest to Taiwan. Launched in 2010, development of the Pingtan Comprehensive Experimental Zone has accelerated recently. It is intended to strengthen cooperation and exchanges in the economy, and also in tourism and culture.

Source : Archiscene (+images) ; Newsking

6 August 2013

Buenos Aires: phase 2 of “Madero Harbour” launched, including housing and two towers for the WTC

Source : Immobidiario

16 July 2013

Synthesis AIVP Days Helsinki : “Culture and competitiveness of port cities

Announcing the creation of cultural infrastructure in port spaces which are still active, or in the process of conversion, often provokes arguments and disagreements between the players concerned, and also the population.

Are cultural installations essential to the success of the port-city relationship?

Disputes are even more open in a context of local or national economic crisis. This was the case in Iceland in 2008 when the construction of the Harpa Concert Hall at the port-city interface of Reykjavik was launched. Investing so heavily in this type of infrastructure appears risky to many, and at all events not a high priority.

The feedback from the latest AIVP Meeting shows that in the long term this kind of bet on the future does pay. It has a positive impact on the quality of life, turning these sites into attractions which draw thousands of visitors, and places where people want to live. They also strengthen relations and cooperation between the parties involved.

Furthermore, in addition to the specific buildings, the challenge is also to bring new life to a whole territory, and to construct communities. This can be achieved by supporting the creation of “culture districts”, as in Reykjavik or Buenos Aires. Thus particular attention is paid to the quality of public spaces to favour the adoption of the new infrastructure by the population. The Spanish example of Malaga is enlightening in this respect, with the creation of a circuit round the cultural infrastructure which already existed in the city centre and the new infrastructure created on the waterfront. New links are forged, a new port-city weft is created. Appropriation by the population becomes possible thanks to the creation of a single port-city public space and a common imaginary.

At Veracruz, in Mexico, the need for a port extension must also be based on maritime culture, a culture of the sea. This enables the citizen to understand that port growth is not only an economic asset, but also contributes to the social and cultural development of the community.

Supporting the creation of a port culture or supporting the acceptance of port-city development or redevelopment projects – in the end the challenge of cultural infrastructure is the same for the decision-makers, whether for the city or the port.

 

Enhancing the port-city image: the port as an inspiration for architects

In a sense, the competition launched by the port of Piraeus in Greece for the reconversion of the silos into a museum is also a longer term strategic investment. Its aim is to achieve social acceptance of the presence of the port and an improvement in its relations with the city, to change the image of a port which is perceived as a barrier.

The benefits expected from the installation of high quality cultural infrastructure and public spaces here are of course associated with the fact that the passenger port is just next door, and that cruise activity is growing rapidly. The architects decided to open the building to the outside and provide views over the active port. References to the industrial past are also used in the treatment of public spaces to assert the identity of the site.

Taking inspiration from port architecture and exploiting it while respecting the logic of the site is the principle followed also in Marseilles for the various ambitious works of cultural infrastructure which have been carried out along the port-city interface. These projects have been conceived specifically as a function of the unique spirit of the location. Here port architecture becomes a tool by which identity asserts itself against the risk of standardisation. In the case of Marseilles, it is also a question of strengthening its strategic positioning on the international scene.

According to Marta Moretti, the emergence of this problem of identity, of the use of port vocabulary and memories of the city’s port history as opportunities for the creation of a new identity, is characteristic of the second generation of waterfront projects. The economic crisis appears to have brought about a change of attitude, insisting more on the re-use and exploitation of abandoned urban infrastructure. This change is a particular feature of the waterfront redevelopment operations of Northern Europe. Here, the opportunity is taken to re-think the waterfront while paying more attention to the question of sustainability and the importance of public spaces.

 

Citizens, partners in port performance

Port performance now is additionally measured by the degree of knowledge that a territory has of its own industrial and economic tissue. This is especially true in the case of a port-city, which often suffers from the negative and sometimes false image which its own citizens have. How then can a society be constructed which is able to contribute to economic development on the basis of its own identity?

For Hakan Fagerström (Tallink Ferry Company), the emergence of a port culture may have a positive influence on the local economic tissue of the port, but only so long as it is adopted by all the players of the port-city. The need, for economic reasons, to remain in the heart of Helsinki is particularly important for passenger transport companies, whose customers do not like to arrive in a no-man’s-land.

And it is just as important for the city to safeguard activities compatible with urban uses and to offer a berth to ships which demonstrate international trade over the port. According to Pascal Freneau of the Port of Nantes in France, ports are among the elements which structure the world, and comprehension of how trade functions is to be encouraged.

Likewise the Israeli port of Ashdod, since the port was modernised in 2005, has decided to redefine its business strategy and basic values by trying to improve its image and its relationship with the public. This step is born of the conviction that collaboration with the community and its principal institutions is an essential value for a port authority sometimes faced with a difficult social dialogue.

The creation of a Port Centre is one of the measures adopted to give back a certain pride to port workers, and in turn to show the population and the community of Ashdod the different activities and careers offered by the port. It is also a meeting point allowing the port to open its doors and show potential investors the interest shown in the territory by the various communities, institutions and companies. Its attractiveness is strengthened by a local dynamic which invests in the development of a shared port culture.

 

ISPS code, restricted spaces: how to create and manage cultural events in the port environment

For Jean-François Driant, Director of a major cultural infrastructure at Le Havre in France, “There is nothing that looks so like a scene in a theatre as a port basin.” The port is a tremendous vehicle for an imaginary. The only difficulty is to find a common space in which to translate this imaginary while respecting the constraints of artistic creation and the needs of port operations.

The debate underlined the fact that the ISPS Code seems particularly difficult for port authorities to get round, as was shown by the example of Guadeloupe, subjected to pressure and control by the neighbouring United States. As Harald Jaeger, CEO of the port of Valparaiso in Chile remarked, security is an asset for a port, a value to be protected. It would take many years to recover lost cruise ship passengers after an attack. For all that, the 15 years’ experience of Valparaiso, with many initiatives in the cultural, sporting, recreational, etc. fields, show that temporary partial opening of the port (10 days per year) is possible. Contributions from the floor: according to the President of the port of Bahia Blanca in Argentina, one idea is to create specific corridors inside the port, which could be financed by incorporating the cost into port dues. At Malaga, after three years of discussion, access to the wharves when there are no cruise ships in port may be possible in future.

Flexibility seems to be the key word, including being open to events generating up to a million visitors, like the Tall Ships Races. An event which, apart from the immediate benefits for the city, had a double positive impact: strengthening cooperation between city and port players, and generating financing which can subsequently be re-injected into port-city redevelopment projects.

Constructing continuity between city and port, creating an identity and reinforcing culture and the local community, in the long run is a formidable lever for economic and social development which can irrigate an entire territory.

 

AIVP Days Helsinki June 2013 : Presentations available here

Photos Gallery

10 July 2013

Sydney, Darling Harbour: project revised

A new proposal for Darling Harbour which takes public reaction into account has just been unveiled. The modifications particularly concern three major buildings in the project: the International Convention Centre, the Exhibition Centre and the theatre.

Source : Architecture & Design (+ images)

Citizen Port

16 January 2019

Publication of a ITF and WBU study on the impact of automation on jobs in the transport industry

This is the first independent study on this crucially important issue. Some 40% of the research focused on the maritime sector, including an analysis of the situation in 17 countries. The report stresses that the impact of automation will be gradual, bringing changes not just to jobs themselves but also to their location, potentially generating social tensions.

Full article: ITF Global / WMU

16 January 2019

Supporting research: City Port integration is one of the themes selected by port operator Yilport for its 2019 innovation competition.

Full article: Yilport / Portal Portuario

16 January 2019

Belgium: an air quality map for Flanders, including Ghent, Zeebrugge and Antwerp, created with the help of 20,000 members of the public.

Full article: curieuzeneuzen.be

16 January 2019

Taiwan: the port of Hualien displays outdoor artworks to encourage residents to stroll in certain public port spaces.

Full article: Taiwan International Ports

14 January 2019

Marc Van Peel, former alderman of the port of Antwerp, is to work towards the creation of a port museum by the Port Center Havencentrum

Full article: Flows

14 January 2019

Cruise industry: Chile adopts a draft law to allow cabotage for liners between port cities.

Full article: Portal Portuario

14 January 2019

Castellon (Spain): more than 1,100 pupils from 28 schools visited the port in 2018 as part of the “Know Your Port” campaign

Full article : Autoridad Portuaria de Castellón

9 January 2019

The Port of Prince Rupert sets aside Can$ 1 M to preserve the Skeen river salmon, vital to the local economy.

Full article: Marine Link

9 January 2019

The Port of Bilbao is continuing to organise free tours of the port for adult members of the public every Saturday and Sunday, an idea first launched in 2004.

Full article: Bilbao Port

9 January 2019

Port of Guadeloupe: the Cayoli environmental project enters a new phase with the restoration of a mangrove area

Full article: Port Guadeloupe Caraïbes

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Enterprise-driver Port

16 January 2019

A Space X rocket has returned for the first time to the Port of Los Angeles, to be reconfigured at a dedicated logistics base.

Full article: Port Technology

16 January 2019

Antwerp: INEOS invests 3 billion euros, confirming the port’s status as the European leader in the chemical sector, generating 400 direct and 2,000 indirect jobs

Full article: Port of Antwerp

16 January 2019

Singapore: the maritime economy accounts for 7% of the state’s GDP, with container traffic up by 8M in 2018 to 36.6 TEUs

Full article: Port Technology

16 January 2019

Morocco will invest 285 million euros in its ports between now and 2012, and will launch the Port Competitiveness Observatory in 2019

Full article: ANP / El Vigia

16 January 2019

The Port of Santander actively involved in creating the “Puerto + Startups” ecosystem to promote innovation and collaboration

Full article: Diario del Puerto

14 January 2019

Port and circular economy: growing potential, particularly for ports attached to large urban centres

In this article, the authors and researchers provide an overview of the potential of this new economic concept, which aims to re-use, recycle or re-manufacture. Numerous examples from the Netherlands highlight four priorities: preparing for a reduction in raw materials shipped, attracting new logistics and industrial activities, developing genuine clusters, and pooling energy flows.

Full article: Port Economics

14 January 2019

The Mayors of Valencia and Sagunto keen for dialogue with the port in the interests of their joint City Port territory.

Full article: Diario del Puerto

14 January 2019

The Mayor of Iquique hails an agreement between Brazil and Chile on a bio-ocean corridor that will strengthen the ports of northern Chile.

Full article: Portal Portuario

9 January 2019

Whether vertical or horizontal, port cooperation remains a key priority

Many ports are currently looking at establishing closer ties with operators in their hinterlands, in some cases even developing their own terminals there or seeking cooperation with neighbouring or complementary ports. Joost Hintjens of Antwerp University proposes an academic approach to these strategies, while on the ground the likes of Barcelona and Tarragona are working together.

Full article: Port Technology / Diario del Puerto

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