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Urban Port

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. ”

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Debate between leaders of the cruise ship industry and port-cities

AIVP followed with much interest the work of the conference organised by the Cruise Europe association, which held a meeting for its members in Le Havre on 23, 24 and 25 April this year. More than one hundred delegates involved in the development of the cruise ship business in port-cities, from a score of countries in Northern and Western Europe, took part in the conference.The port-city as an economic adjustment variable?
The cruise operators represented among the speakers (Holland America Line, Celebrity, Carnival, AIDA…) testified to the good health of the cruise market in Northern and Western Europe, while stressing the difficulty of ensuring that the business remains profitable economically. The cost of fuel and port costs were mentioned to explain this apparently paradoxical situation. The direct and indirect costs associated with calls at European ports were once again vigorously denounced by the lines’ representatives. The question of the balance sought between passenger expectations of an attractive and comfortable programme of calls on the one hand, and the companies’ demand for maximum profitability on the other, is necessarily delicate. In the search for this financial balance, companies see the choice of the port-cities at which they call as an adjustment variable. These port-cities therefore have a strong incentive to offer conditions for ship calls which meet the companies’ strategic demands. For a start, every port-city must know how to negotiate a win-win partnership, while understanding that it is more and more difficult to make the most of the profits to be earned from their geographical situation in a context of strong competition between ports which are ever better equipped for cruise ship calls.
In search of authenticity
The structure of each cruise and, naturally, the question of the calls and the excursions available, were central issues in the debates. To reduce the variable costs of their operations, the companies look for new circuits which are linear rather than loops; passengers therefore embark and disembark at different ports. Moreover, slow steaming, already extensively used by cargo vessels, is an increasingly common practice among cruise ship operators. Steaming speeds at sea have been falling steadily for several years to save fuel. As a result of this, ports of call cannot be too far apart in order to optimise passage time, which is the least expensive for the operator and can generate the best profits for companies through consumption of the services offered on board. In the port of call, the companies are careful to ensure that the terminal is close to the city centre, and that good road infrastructure exists for day excursions. Failing that, the offer of launches (free of course!) by local players is naturally appreciated.

The quality of the excursions offered, the level of on-shore reception and the interest of each port of call contribute to the reputation and success of the cruise, and therefore of the company. For the cruise ship operator, novelty, authenticity and exclusivity are values which are sure to guarantee a satisfying “repeater” rate among passengers, who are also encouraged to recount their “experience” on the internet and social networks. For European cruises, this indirect marketing strategy is proving particularly successful.
Conclusions
It is hard to say who is winning this game in which port-cities and cruise ship companies try not to be first to blink. The strong market dynamic is sufficient to keep everybody happy for the moment: the companies who are permanently refining their economic model, the port-cities who are polishing their images and can expect substantial economic benefits, and finally the passengers, who every day are offered more, at more competitive prices. However the equilibrium is fragile and the importance of the role played by the industry’s professionals in each port of call should be stressed. In a few years, they have become essential points of contact for the companies and the first to encourage the formation of local “cruise clubs”. A great advantage of meetings like this is that it brings them together and allows them refine the strategies of their own port-cities.

See also:
http://www.cruise-europe.org/

4 June 2013

Kengo Kuma: the Japanese architect builds culture into the old river port at Besançon (France)

The recently inaugurated “City of the Arts” at Besançon brings together the FRAC (Regional Fund for Contemporary Art), located in an old brick-built warehouse, with a new building housing the Music Conservatory. The public esplanade serves the whole ensemble, creating a link between city, art and the river.
Source : Kengo Kuma And Associates ; Le Moniteur

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica

31 May 2013

Copenhague: inicio de las obras para la construcción del Centro Nacional de Arquitectura diseñado por Rem Koolhass

El Centro se implantará en el emplazamiento de una antigua cervecería donde también se prevén oficinas y viviendas. Dicho centro permitirá vincular el centro de la ciudad con el frente costero histórico y el barrio cultural de Slotsholmen.
Source : OMA ; Cyber Archi

31 May 2013

Alotau in Papua-New Guinea preparing to receive cruise ship calls

The Port of Alotau will be restructured by PNG Ports Corporation Limited (PNGPCL) between now and October to enable it to receive the first cruise ships operated by Carnival Australia, one of the biggest operators in the Australian market. This will make it the biggest cruise ship port in the country.
Source: PNG Ports Corporation

31 May 2013

Los Angeles: the port adopts a heritage action plan

The port of Los Angeles is to make an inventory of its historical, cultural and architectural resources. This evaluation will allow it to draw up an action plan and establish priorities for the preservation and, where possible, re-use of its heritage.
Source : Port of Los Angeles

Citizen Port

30 October 2019

The Ocean Cleanup organization launched “the Interceptor”, an autonomous boat to tackle plastic pollution in rivers. Two prototypes are already working in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Klang (Malaysia)

The barge uses a floating barrier that guides the litter to a conveyor belt extracting the garbage from the water. The debris is distributed into six internal dumpsters with capacity up to 50 m3. When the barge is full, the local operators recibe a signal to collect it and take the garbage to a waste management facility. The barge includes several solar panels, making the system also energy neutral. This kind of solutions can considerably improve the water quality in many port cities, contributing to goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030.

Full article: The Ocean Cleanup

30 October 2019

The South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) hosted the Forward Thinking for Maritime Education and Training Excellence Conference to discuss the new skills development and entrepreneurial opportunities offered by the blue economy and the 4th industrial revolution. The underlying discussion was the need to speed up the creations of jobs in the ocean economy, to reach the targets of the Operation Phakisa, launched in 2014, to expand the blue economy

Full article: Global Africa

30 October 2019

Natural habitat created by the Port of Tilbury as compensation measure for new distribution park becomes wildlife relevant site for insects and invertebrates

Full article: Forth Ports , Greenport

30 October 2019

The Port of Strasbourg offers new guided tours responding to the success of previous visits during the European Heritage Day. The tours will take place on November 6th

Full article: Batorama

28 October 2019

Port of Seattle joins partners to develop the “Maritime Blue Innovation Accelerator”

Port of Seattle partners up with co-working company WeWork and Washington State cluster Maritime Blue to create Maritime Blue Innovation Accelerator, a new start-up incubator. The main goals are to help maritime companies to innovate, be more sustainable and establish Washington State as a global leader in maritime economy. These programs are crucial to foster human capital development for the future port city economy. There are already similar solutions in Rotterdam, Hamburg or Singapore.

Full article: Port of Seattle, Maritime Blue

28 October 2019

Port of Valencia launches the SuperLabPorts, a platform to support innovative port and maritime start-ups in the field of climate change

Full article: Esmartcity

23 October 2019

Port leaders gather in Barcelona to discuss Smart port technologies in the event “Smart Ports – Piers of the Future” between 19 to 21 of november 2019

The Port of Barcelona, along with other 5 leading ports – including AIVP members Rotterdam, Antwerp and Montreal-, will host during the next Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona, a parallel event titled “Smart Ports – Piers of the Future”. Among the main discussion topics will be digitalisation, automation and connectivity.

Full article: Smart Ports, Program

23 October 2019

Port of Rotterdam Authority joined the ‘Noah’s Train’ initiative to draw attention of the environmental benefits of rail over road transportation. The train includes two containers from each one of the stops specifically designed for the occasion.

Full article: Port Technology, Rail Freight Forward

23 October 2019

Amendments to the BWM Convention to prevent invasive species enter into force this week. The amendment is the implementation of a new schedule for the ballast water D2 Standard, with stricter criteria of presence of organisms and potentially harmful pathogens. Other amendments include survey and certification

Full article: Maritime Professional

21 October 2019

European ports meet in Venice to discuss the future of cruises

Port of Venice hosts the meeting “Cruise 2030: Call for Action”, gathering delegates of several major European cruise ports to discuss the future of the sector and the interaction with cities. The main idea on the table is developing a “Europe Class fleet” compatible with European port cities. This discussions directly reflect goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030, concerning health and life quality of local citizens. The next meeting of the working group will be in Palma de Mallorca, next January


Full article: Port of Venice 

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Enterprise-driver Port

30 October 2019

Strasbourg wants to rely on river transport for more sustainable urban logistics.

Since May 2018, a terminal has been set up at the Quai des Pécheurs in the heart of the metropolis for the needs of a construction site. The City wants now to go further today and is calling for projects to make this terminal a platform for low-carbon urban logistics. The terminal shall operate on a daily basis in perfect harmony with other urban and tourist uses of the waterway. This project is part of the Strasbourg climate plan. Full article: VNF / NPI

30 October 2019

Climate: global groups like Nike or H&M are, like some major shipping companies are, refusing to use the Arctic route.

Full article: Sea Trade Maritime News / Flows

30 October 2019

Following the study by Deloitte, the ports of Antwerp and Zeebrugge set a two-years deadline to lay the foundations for a possible merger.

Full article: Port of Zeebrugge / Flows 1 / Flows 2

30 October 2019

The ports of Duisburg and Liège rely on intermodality to take advantage of direct rail links with China.

Full article: Marine Link / Flows

28 October 2019

Plastic waste: Malaysia negotiates the return of almost 300 containers of waste to their countries of origin.

Full article: Marine Link

28 October 2019

Marseille: in addition to cold ironing projects, cruise industry operators are committed to cutting ship sailing speeds

Full article: L’Antenne

23 October 2019

The Port Equipment Manufacturers Association (PEMA), a member of AIVP, expands its field of action to tackle the challenges facing ports

Full article: Hellenic Shipping News

23 October 2019

River navigation defines graded levels of autonomy for vessels, to improve professional and personal living conditions for operators.

Full article: L’Antenne

23 October 2019

Spain: the new national port framework should lead to safe, sustainable ports existing in harmony with citizens

Full article: Rotacion

21 October 2019

For the first time, ports rate climate change among the three biggest environmental priorities

Cutting carbon emissions and adpting infrastructures are key concerns. However, more and more ports, local partner communities and businesses are organising in clusters to tackle issues globally, with citizens increasingly concerned about the way their future is being shaped. Meanwhile, the IMO has recently removed obstacles to cross-border carbon storage, which should help the industry organise and operate more efficiently.

Full article : ESPO (pdf) / All about shipping

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