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Urban Port

10 June 2013

Cherbourg: heat pump installed in the port’s commercial basin supplies 1,300 homes

Source : Le Monde

6 June 2013

Strasbourg: the old port warehouse will be built up three storeys higher!

Work is in progress on the Seegmuller warehouse. The addition of a rectangular space on three levels proposed by architects Georges Heintz and Anne-Sophie Kehr will allow the development of part of the planned residential construction. A less space-greedy solution for the programme on the “Malraux Peninsula”.
Source : Bâti Actu (+ images)

 

6 June 2013

Stockholm: a pilot city for green growth

With more than forty years’ commitment to environmental issues, Stockholm is aiming at Zero fossil fuel consumption by 2050. Today it is a model for the “Green Economy”, particularly through achievements in two port-city sectors: the Hammerby eco-district and the Royal Seaport. Detailed report
Source : City of Stockholm

 

6 June 2013

Calais (France) incorporates water transport into its public transport network

Source : Le Marin

6 June 2013

Rotterdam – Hô-Chi-Minh-City: cooperation agreement on climate change, particularly rising sea-levels

Source : Cities Today

5 June 2013

Toronto: landscape architecture for tomorrow’s city

Toronto’s population continues to grow and high rise buildings are springing up all over the city. To counteract this, the authorities are implementing a global strategy to preserve the quality of life. Landscape architecture is at the heart of this strategy, particularly along the waterfront.
Source : Huffington Post

5 June 2013

London: refurbishment of the marina in the three basins of St Katherine’s Docks

Source : Medberths

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. ”

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Debate between leaders of the cruise ship industry and port-cities

AIVP followed with much interest the work of the conference organised by the Cruise Europe association, which held a meeting for its members in Le Havre on 23, 24 and 25 April this year. More than one hundred delegates involved in the development of the cruise ship business in port-cities, from a score of countries in Northern and Western Europe, took part in the conference.The port-city as an economic adjustment variable?
The cruise operators represented among the speakers (Holland America Line, Celebrity, Carnival, AIDA…) testified to the good health of the cruise market in Northern and Western Europe, while stressing the difficulty of ensuring that the business remains profitable economically. The cost of fuel and port costs were mentioned to explain this apparently paradoxical situation. The direct and indirect costs associated with calls at European ports were once again vigorously denounced by the lines’ representatives. The question of the balance sought between passenger expectations of an attractive and comfortable programme of calls on the one hand, and the companies’ demand for maximum profitability on the other, is necessarily delicate. In the search for this financial balance, companies see the choice of the port-cities at which they call as an adjustment variable. These port-cities therefore have a strong incentive to offer conditions for ship calls which meet the companies’ strategic demands. For a start, every port-city must know how to negotiate a win-win partnership, while understanding that it is more and more difficult to make the most of the profits to be earned from their geographical situation in a context of strong competition between ports which are ever better equipped for cruise ship calls.
In search of authenticity
The structure of each cruise and, naturally, the question of the calls and the excursions available, were central issues in the debates. To reduce the variable costs of their operations, the companies look for new circuits which are linear rather than loops; passengers therefore embark and disembark at different ports. Moreover, slow steaming, already extensively used by cargo vessels, is an increasingly common practice among cruise ship operators. Steaming speeds at sea have been falling steadily for several years to save fuel. As a result of this, ports of call cannot be too far apart in order to optimise passage time, which is the least expensive for the operator and can generate the best profits for companies through consumption of the services offered on board. In the port of call, the companies are careful to ensure that the terminal is close to the city centre, and that good road infrastructure exists for day excursions. Failing that, the offer of launches (free of course!) by local players is naturally appreciated.

The quality of the excursions offered, the level of on-shore reception and the interest of each port of call contribute to the reputation and success of the cruise, and therefore of the company. For the cruise ship operator, novelty, authenticity and exclusivity are values which are sure to guarantee a satisfying “repeater” rate among passengers, who are also encouraged to recount their “experience” on the internet and social networks. For European cruises, this indirect marketing strategy is proving particularly successful.
Conclusions
It is hard to say who is winning this game in which port-cities and cruise ship companies try not to be first to blink. The strong market dynamic is sufficient to keep everybody happy for the moment: the companies who are permanently refining their economic model, the port-cities who are polishing their images and can expect substantial economic benefits, and finally the passengers, who every day are offered more, at more competitive prices. However the equilibrium is fragile and the importance of the role played by the industry’s professionals in each port of call should be stressed. In a few years, they have become essential points of contact for the companies and the first to encourage the formation of local “cruise clubs”. A great advantage of meetings like this is that it brings them together and allows them refine the strategies of their own port-cities.

See also:
http://www.cruise-europe.org/

Citizen Port

15 January 2020

Exhibition “Container – the box that changed the world” in Fremantle (Australia), explains how the shipping container impacted the way we live

Victoria Quay

15 January 2020

New book tells the stories of dockworkers in the port of Dublin (Ireland). ‘Dublin Port Diaries’, as it is titled, shows the social impact of the port, gathering memories otherwise lost

Dublin Port

15 January 2020

Hydrogen powered will navigate the port of Hamburg (Germany) starting 2021/2022

NDR, Sat1Regional

15 January 2020

What can be done to reduce marine litter in touristic coastal areas? European project CAPonLITTER will provide guidelines based on best practices and innovative policies

Agência Portuguesa do Ambiente, Interreg Europe

15 January 2020

University and port work together in Sevilla (Spain)

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The new Centre for University Innovation of the Port of Sevilla will be placed in the port territory, counting with 16 million € of EU financing. A committee selected in the beginning of 2020 the first 20 innovation projects, each of them including an industrial PhD. These researches will focus on topics such as renewable energies production and storage, new materials, Internet of things, logistics, blockchain in the food industry or marine detection of hazardous substances. The research projects must be operational before the end of 2021. This initiative shows the path towards fruitful collaboration between academia and industry, a relationship that has not always been easy, but it is crucial to answer to upcoming challenges.

ABC, Diario de Sevilla

15 January 2020

Young maritime professionals will get more opportunities in Panama

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A new program named “My first maritime work experience” has been. This program will give to young professionals the opportunity to learn about the different careers in the Panamanian maritime authority. It results of a collaboration between the maritime affairs and labour ministries, inspired by the national initiative “learning by doing”. The directorate of Gente de Mar (People from the Sea), will be in charge of forming the new generations of maritime professionals. The Maritime University of Panamá and the Panamanian Association of Navy Officers selected the first group of 20 trainees from different areas such as nautical sciences, shipbuilding or maritime administration. In the six-month period the young professionals will go through training to later join the different functions under the supervision of staff from the maritime authority.

Autoridad Marítima de Panamá

15 January 2020

Showcasing the Port: the observation tower at the Port of Tacoma (USA) has afforded views of the port since 1988, 365 days a year!

SouthSound Talk

8 January 2020

International project to facilitate sustainable tourism in Mediterranean coastal areas

Spanish Ports

8 January 2020

Three European ports speed up towards carbon neutrality

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Several European ports have presented their plans to reduce their carbon footprint in the coming years. The port of Helsinki (Finland), drafted the Carbon-Neutral Port 2035 including 50 measures, mostly destined to reduce the port’s emissions and those from vessels. These measures combine reducing the energy usage, acquiring energy from carbon-neutral sources and carbon offsets to compensate the remaining emissions. One example of the actions to be taken is the new price list for port operations, including significant “environmental” discounts. The port of Amsterdam (The Netherlands) is even more ambitious, aiming at carbon neutrality in 2030. Its priority is to boost clean energy production at port, such as the new project to generate hydrogen using electrolysis. Amsterdam port is also developing maritime wind energy fields. In Hamburg (Germany), the main terminal operator HHLA, wants to become carbon neutral by 2040, by using green electricity for all its operations. The company already reduced the CO2 emissions of container operations by 30% in 2019, aiming at 50% until 2030. The main challenge will be in the future to make the complete logistic chain carbon neutral.

Port of Helsinki, Portal Portuario, GreenPort

18 December 2019

Whale protection program of the Port of Vancouver (Canada) celebrates 5 years

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The Enhancing Cetacean Habitat and Observation (ECHO) Program was created in 2014. It has ever since gathered a broad and diverse group of advisors, under the leadership of the port authority to protect the endangered southern resident killer whales. In order to do so, the ECHO program has measured the noise levels of more than 10 000 ships in the Salish Sea. Over 5000 vessels have voluntarily slowed down or detoured to protect the feeding area of this cetacean from underwater noise. The program also offered resources to help mariners to raise awareness of the effects ships can have on these animals. The program has produced in this period several documents including a “Mariner’s Guide to Whales, Dolphins, Porpoises of Wester Canada”, the “Whales in our Waters tutorial” or the app WhaleReport Alert System, besides yearly reports and scientific papers.

Port of Vancouver 1, Port of Vancouver 2, Google Play, Inhabitat

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Enterprise-driver Port

17 January 2020

Rwanda: Four ports on Lake Kivu earmarked as an alternative to road transport

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Lake Kivu in western Rwanda marks the border with the neighbouring DRC. The four ports will be built with the help of the Netherlands, and spread out from the north to the south of the lake. They will promote improved mobility for passengers and goods between the various districts along the bank. Within twenty years, they should handle the majority of commercial cross-border trade and some 3 million passengers. The Government is also keen to use the ports as a platform for more ambitious plans to kick-start water-based transport on other lakes and rivers in Rwanda. The aim is to reduce the use of onshore transport infrastructures, maintenance of which represents a significant portion of the national budget. Finally, the project will help to boost competitiveness for both the food industry (beer, tea, coffee) and the cement industry, while also giving a lift to the tourist sector.

The New times

17 January 2020

Whether fixed or floating, offshore wind power is now becoming truly industrialised. Cooperation between ports will need to be strengthened as a result.

Wind Europe

17 January 2020

Port of Montreal (Canada): fluid activities vital for combining economic efficiency and respect for the local population

Port de Montréal

10 December 2019

The transport and logistics industry faced with the environmental and energy challenge

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The sector currently accounts for 25% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency is one of the biggest ways to cut emissions. While there is a consensus on the need to gradually phase out fossil fuels, LNG is seen as a stepping stone, while in the longer term, making the right choice between hydrogen, ammonia and biofuels remains a key challenge. Another way to reduce emissions is intermodality, with the aim of reducing the proportion of goods moved by road, and increasing short distance transport by rail, river and sea. Finally, innovating for more efficient logistics is the third solution. The aim is to reduce overall energy use, while ensuring that emissions avoided at sea are not simply moved onshore, particularly as a result of increased congestion in port cities.

Diario del Puerto 1 / Diario del Puerto 2 / Diario del Puerto 3 / Diario del Puerto 4

10 December 2019

The growth of cruise tourism and the decision on whether to host liners is a choice for society, according to the President of the Port of Valencia (Spain).

Diario del Puerto

10 December 2019

Port terminals working towards carbon neutrality: HHLA in Hamburg (Germany) is progressing faster than expected and APM Terminal is taking the train Gothenburg (Sweden).

Splash 247 / Port Technology

3 December 2019

Environment and climate: how far has the maritime and port sector progressed?

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Reducing carbon footprints, developing new energy sources, promoting multimodality, and electrifying installations are all areas in which ports have been taking responsibility for nearly ten years. AIVP provides you with regular updates on the latest developments in these areas, in which there is also a trend towards greater cooperation, with ten Nordic ports recently announcing initiatives to tackle the issues involved. At sea, with one month to go before the new IMO regulations come into force, things appear to be moving more slowly. In a recent report by the Global Maritime Forum, the maritime industry itself expressed concern about its preparedness for the new regulations, decarbonisation and the demands of civil society.

Flows / Global Maritime Forum / Report (pdf) / Ports of Stockholm / Port of Gothenburg

3 December 2019

Port territory: planning a shared City Port future

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Associated British Ports is arguing in favour of shared governance of the City Port territory, calling on politicians to do more to take account of port master plans in their policies. The scale of the commercial, environmental, technical and social changes requires a concerted approach, bringing together all local communities (City Port). These observations go hand in hand with the Port Futures programme, through which ABP is urging its members to innovate).

British Ports Association / Report (pdf)

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