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Urban Port

25 June 2013

Lyon Confluence: Lighting, photovoltaics, geothermics and rapeseed for three positive energy buildings

Source: 20 minutes

24 June 2013

Libreville: Urban development for “Port-Môle”

Chinese capital to be added to Gabonese State funding for a 45-hectare development including a conference centre, a museum, businesses, hotels, offices, etc.  Fishing and yachting activities will be preserved at the port.
Source : Afriqinfos

 

21 June 2013

Hamburg: Extension of old port warehouses

Gerkan, Marg and Partners are the winners of the competition launched by Gebr. Heinemann for the extension of its offices based in two old 19th and 20th century port warehouses at the heart of Hafen City.
Source : GMP Architecten (+ images)

20 June 2013

Izmir (Turkey): Zaha Hadid to lead work on a 276-hectare project if the city is chosen for the World Expo 2020

Source : ArchDaily

20 June 2013

Minneapolis: 3 teams shortlisted for “Water Works”, a park along the Mississippi at the heart of the city

Source : Bustler (+ images)

19 June 2013

Regensburg: A riverside museum

The German firm Woerner und partner has won the competition for the design of the Museum of Bavarian History. One of the main challenges was to integrate the modern building into a sensitive and historical urban context and to recreate the link between the old town and the river Danube.
Source : Nemetschek-Allplan ; Woerner und partner  (+ images)

19 June 2013

Aarhus: The “Canal Houses” project

ADEPT and Luplau Poulsen have been chosen for the building of a 15.500 m2 housing project in the port of Aarhus.  “Canal Houses” will complement their other project “Harbour Houses”, which has just begun construction.  The project will comply with environmental 2020 standards.
Source : Arch Daily (+ images)

 

19 June 2013

Seattle: Old containers transformed into homes by the architect Kai Schwartz

Source : Seattle Times

19 June 2013

Integrating the Port and the City of Rijeka onto the international scene: the Rijeka Gateway Project

In the 1990s the necessity to stop the steady decrease of Port of Rijeka traffic volume imposed a new strategy and development plans to re-boost and ensure the competitiveness of the Port of Rijeka.
The Rijeka Gateway Project is now entering in a decisive implementing phase. The Port and the City of Rijeka are both AIVP members since many years. M. Vojko Obersnel, Mayor of Rijeka City, discussed with us the main stakes and challenges of this project and how it will enhance the attractiveness of the Port and the City, giving to the Port City of Rijeka a new role on the international scene.

Based on a study prepared by the consultants of Rotterdam Maritime Group, the new Master plan and Port Modernisation Project – The Rijeka Gateway Project – got the support of The World Bank through a series of loans which were granted between 2003 and 2009. The partial relocation of port activities out of the city centre makes room for new urban developments on the waterfront and, in parallel for a new quality of life for the whole city.
The Rijeka Gateway Project is now entering in a decisive implementing phase. The Port and the City of Rijeka are both AIVP members since many years. M. Vojko Obersnel, Mayor of Rijeka City, discussed with us the main stakes and challenges of this project and how it will enhance the attractiveness of the Port and the City, giving to the Port City of Rijeka a new role on the international scene.

AiVP: The Rijeka Gateway Project has two main port components: on the Western part of the port with the new development of the port facilities at Zagreb Pier, and on the East with the redevelopment and expansion of the Brajdica Container Terminal. A design and construction contract has been signed in April 2012 with Italian companies for the first phase of the Zagreb Pier Container Terminal. ICTSI, which became a majority shareholder in the concessionaire of the Brajdica Container Terminal in early 2011, has begun its upgrading.
M. Obersnel, as many other port cities around the world, the Port of Rijeka is now engaged in a redevelopment on itself. This one combines a rationalisation of the existing port areas and uses, with their partial expansions. Could you summarize which are the main aims of these two projects, the current state of their implementation and their schedules?

M. Obersnel, Mayor of Rijeka City:

Rijeka within the Pan-European Transport Corridors

Briefly, the Rijeka Gateway Project will revive and promote the importance and the effectiveness of the Rijeka Transportation Route within the European Union and hinterland outside of the EU. At the same time, this is a transportation route of great national importance. Between Rijeka and the Croatian-Hungarian border, it fosters life and economical activities and involves somehow more than 2.5 Million people located in the most developed Croatian counties and cities. Honestly, we are fully aware that, excluding highways, the other two components of this transportation route, the port and the railways need to be modernized, radically and fast if we want to keep pace with other traffic axes. So, the Brajdica Terminal, which is completed and by beginning of July this year it should be in full function, gives us a chance to enhance the container turnover yearly up to 600,000 TEU.  After the 1st phase of construction by 2017, the Zagreb Pier Terminal will help to raise the yearly turnover of containers through port of Rijeka to more than 1 Million TEU.

The construction of the second phase of the Zagreb Pier Terminal can additionally enlarge total port capacity up to 1.2 Million TEU; however this phase will depend on future concessionaire. Apart from the containers, our port will mark a remarkable turnover of liquid cargo (5-8 Million tons yearly), general and bulk cargo (4-5 Million tons yearly). Summarizing all these facts, I would say that the final aims refer not just to reviving the transporting role, but also to provoking the transformation impact on the Croatian economy, by attracting new investments and developing new technologies.

On the 20th May 2013 a large ship from China reached the Adriatic Gate Container Terminal – AGCT, an ICTSI Group Company, managing and operating the Brajdica Container Terminal in Rijeka. The ship brought new equipment: 10 new cranes (2 Post Panamax size quayside gantry cranes, 6 Rubber Tired Gantries (RTG – cranes for the storage area) and 2 Rail Mounted Gantries (RMG – cranes for the rail area). The new equipment is expected to be in full function by the beginning of July 2013.


And, the newly constructed BIP (Border Inspection Point) station, as a prerequisite for Croatia to join the EU as from July 1st onwards; all cargo of animal or vegetable origin which is imported into the European Union has to be inspected within the port(s). The presence of BIP station at AGCT will enable Rijeka to be the first Port of Call on the North Adriatic.

AiVP : The current port activities, and the planned ones, are quite close to the City. Which negative impacts of the previous port activities will be minored or even cancelled thanks to the new port developments? And which integration measures are planned to reduce the possible remaining negative impacts?

M. Obersnel: The urban renewal of the Delta AreaThe most important improvement will happen within the city centre. After removing certain port facilities, the urban renewal of the Delta area and the Baross Port will be enabled. However, the activities of the container terminals will eventually bring some negative impact related to noise and  light, which have already caused complains from citizens who live in the vicinity of the Brajdica Container Terminal, as it is located pretty close to the residential areas.

We have resolved some of the bad impacts, such as the lighting. The monitoring system will soon be activated, so we intend to have the full control over the situation and the possibility to influence the work process in order to avoid conflict situations.

AiVP :  One of the objectives of the Rijeka Gateway Project is to re-open the city to the sea. Cities and Ports around the world are often confronted with the problem of physical barriers (highways, railways, etc…) between the city and the sea. In Rijeka, a marshalling yard and railways used for the port activities constitute such a barrier. But railway is also a more sustainable transport mode for port activities.
Which solutions are considered to solve such a dilemma and to combine opening the city to the sea while preserving sustainable transports for a port traffic that is planned to increase?

Implementing of modern criteria in the reconstruction of the railway and port inffrastructure

M. Obersnel: The best and the final solution for the railway connections in Rijeka will be the new railway bypass. Unfortunately, the present economic situation forces us to look for other, easier and cheaper solutions. One of such solutions is giving up the shore railway (we plan to use it for the city railway), and the other solution refers to the reconstruction of existing railway crossing the city area. By implementing the modern criteria in the reconstruction of the railway, conflicts with the urban area should be avoided. This means that the conflict crossings of the railway with the roads and pedestrian corridors will be resolved as well as the problems of noise, vibrations etc.
The railway should be used also for public transportation. The parts of railway that are visible in the urban area and citizens’ access spots (as it will become a city railway) should be arranged as attractive as possible. We think that such measures can break the idea of the railway as a barrier.

AiVP : On the Western port, some warehouses will be demolished and other ones rehabilitated for new port functions. But the existing huge grain silos are also a visual and physical barrier between the City and the Sea. It was envisaged to have them demolished and rebuilt 15 kms away in a new port zone. Is that still planned? Does their reconversion to urban functions has also been considered initially?

M. Obersnel : To demolish the grain silos or to rehabilitate them – the question is still open. The solution will resolve from the development policy of the Rijeka port systems. We have to be open and admit that these questions are not our priority. The core of our interest lies in the fastest possible modernization of the railway and the construction of new specialized container terminals. However, when tackling the interventions with gradual effects, we cannot refrain from giving services to handle other types of cargo.

AiVP : Between the Eastern and the Western part of the Port and the City, the Delta / Porto Baros areas is the third component of the Rijeka Gateway Project. These areas were used for port activities (mainly for the handling and storage of timber) until the middle of 2012. Their relocation to other parts of the port makes room for a new Port/City interface. 17 ha are concerned of which 13.7 ha for urban development, 1.8 ha for a marina and 2.2 ha for public infrastructures and parks.
The project includes the construction of a new passenger terminal within the existing passenger pier. It will enhance the attractiveness of Rijeka as a passenger port. Which are the expected growth in the passenger traffic and the possible economic impact on the City?

Maritime Passenger Terminal

M. Obersnel : The first phase of the maritime passenger terminal has already been constructed at the breakwater foot. Unfortunately, the seasonal character of travelling, the shortage of connection lines between Rijeka and the islands in catchment area as well as other cities along the Croatian coast, has been affecting us by a decreasing trend of passengers during last four years.  So, our important task is to make our Port more attractive to cruise operators, and also to keep on requesting from the Ministry of the Maritime Affairs, Transport and Infrastructure of the Republic of Croatia to significantly enhance the local sea traffic.

AiVP : Which kind of passenger terminal is planned? A “mono-functional one” solely dedicated to port functions or is there a possibility to implement a facility mixing port and urban functions (shops, restaurants, views, public spaces, etc…) as we can observe now more and more in other port cities?

M. Obersnel : We have in mind a passenger terminal that involves both, the content of a passenger terminal and the contents dedicated to citizens and visitors. Moreover, the Terminal is situated next to the Baross Port and its contents should be interesting also to the nautical tourist. Generally speaking, the urban redevelopment project will show additional directions for the development of contents on the Passenger Terminal and in its vicinity.

Delta Area

AiVP : The possible guidelines and requirements for the development of the Delta & Porto Baros areas have been prepared by Cowi Consultants and Gehl Architects from Copenhagen, Denmark. They suggested a division in three districts: a park district on the Northern part, the closest to the city centre; a maritime district on the South directly opened to the sea and connected to the marina planned on the Baros zone; and, in-between, an urban district. A large part is reserved for free spaces as the total building volume is limited to 40% of the whole area (1.2 million m³).
Could you summarize which are the main components of the planned built facilities and how they will complement the existing ones of the city centre?

M. Obersnel : I have to partly correct the initial context of your question. In their study, Cowi Consultants and Gehl Architects just followed a land use of Delta area and Baross Port envisaged by the Physical Plan of the City of Rijeka, approved in 2003. The mentioned Plan divides the Delta area into two main portions: the northern, envisaged to be arranged as a City park, encompassing 4 ha of land between the river and the canal, and the southern portion of 12 ha approx., located also between the river and the canal, but open to the sea and directly connected with Baross Port, with stunning views on the Rijeka bay, the islands, the mountains and the rest of the city. This portion of the Delta area is recognized as a mixed use area with a combination of residential and business area, retail, services, public, hotel and facilities of all kinds.
The interface with the marina and its facilities should bring a new identity and add something unique that does not already exist in the city. The structure within the Delta Area should be of a new character and not a copy of existing city structures. But, due to worthy and recognizable existing city centre, the Delta area should in the same time be developed as an extension of the city centre. Precisely, the old part of the City centre and the new one has to pervade each other and function as a whole. The public interest would be represented by a new multifunctional hall, an aquarium and a variety of public areas (squares, streets, promenades, sidewalks, etc).

AiVP : Two landmark buildings could be constructed according to Gehl Architects: one in the “urban district” and the other one in the “Maritime District”. Which kind of equipment could be used and for which functions?

M. Obersnel : Usually, the landmarks are iconic buildings in terms of height, design, position, typology and/or similar properties. We have not already précised which buildings and how many of them have to be designed and developed in such a way, which also emerged from our concept of urban planning and architectural design. Namely, the first step will be the launching of public competition for urban design of the Delta area and Baross Port at the beginning of June and will last till the beginning of October 2013. This competition will be of international character, but under one condition: the architects and urban planners from outside of Croatia can participate if they would engage at least one Croatian architect.  Further developers are expected to be selected through international bidding procedure next year, and they will be obliged to develop the site in accordance with the best of entries from the previous competition. So, in direct negotiation between the City, the developer and the public opinion, we also expect to define the landmarks.

Urban Design of the Delta Area and Baross Port

AiVP : Gehl Architects has also suggested a phasing strategy aimed at developing first the facilities which could attract people and visitors on the redeveloped areas with the double objective of generating revenues and attracting private investors and partners for the following stages. Such a strategy could be considered in other port cities projects and will be of great interest to the members of AIVP. Could you explain it further?M. Obersnel : The (re)development in phases is acceptable due to many reasons. We are fully aware that at this moment the Baross Port could be converted into a marina very quickly and without big expenditures. But the final proposal of phases will reflect a real relationship between the specific investors’ expectations and the real estate market respond.

AiVP : To conclude, such projects are of course a long way process, sometimes generating some impatience from the citizens and partners. Even that is still an on-going project, which are the main lessons you can emphasize till now and which are your main expectations in the close future?

M. Obersnel : The citizens are impatient, indeed, and so are the experts, which are not to be forgotten, because the Delta urbanization project is recognized as a project of the century and as an opportunity to create new jobs and to realize the best achievements in urbanism, architecture, public space arrangement. The future investors and developers should also be aware of this. Many examples in the world confirm my words and show that similar principles had to be obeyed.
The Delta Area should inspire the city with new life and good vibrations. The new attractions in the area should add value to the existing city life in Rijeka and support the already progressing development of other city functions (university, port, green industries, etc.) in order to constitute the city as to become more attractive for new citizens who will choose Rijeka as a temporary or permanent place to live.
The city of Rijeka has a desire for an identity related to water, events, health, sport, culture, nature and food. Rijeka has a strong potential for practicing a natural way of living with beaches, mountains and walking tracks. In relation to other towns and cities in the region, Rijeka can offer unique cultural activities. In developing the Delta Area, these identities could be reached and even expanded.

The Delta area will soon receive a new identity


The Port Authority of Rijeka and Rijeka City

are members of AIVP

Download – Rijeka Case Study

Citizen Port

27 May 2020

Innovative or traditional, all approaches are welcome for sustainable port cities

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Port cities around the globe are developing different projects to reduce the negative externalities of port activities. In Spain, the port of Valencia just received the government approval to build an electric substation with a capacity of 30 Megawatts, giving a first step towards its goal of becoming a carbon-free until 2030. Also in Spain, the port of Barcelona has launched a free sustainability consultancy service for its end costumers, helping them know the emissions of logistic chains and facilitate the decision making towards greener transportation. Other promising field of study is blue carbon, or the process by which marine plants capture carbon and transfer it into sediments. The port of Seattle (USA) will collaborate with Washington State departments to study the benefits of this procedure. Finally, another way to reduce the polluting emissions is to avoid them at all, supporting carbon-free transport, such as wit, like the port of Le Havre is doing in the project TOWT – Transport à la Voile.

Europa Press – Barcelona, El Periódico de la Energía – Valencia, Green Marine – Seattle, Twitter – Le Havre

27 May 2020

Port Cities of San Antonio and Valparaíso show their commitment with local community

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Both leading Chilean ports have deployed several key actions in recent weeks to support workers, children and small business owners. As we saw in previous newsletters, drawing contests have been a popular measure to entertain children and keep the contact with the port. Almost 600 children participated in the competition organized by the port of Valparaíso with the local art museum. In a similar way, the port of San Antonio is inviting children aged 6-13 to participate in their competition “draw your port from home”, co-organized with the local newspaper. From a social perspective, both ports have extended their support during this crisis. They have continued with sanitation actions and helped port workers with food packages and vaccination campaigns. Additionally, the port of San Antonio also decided to significantly reduce the rent for local craftsmen with shops in the waterfront.

Radio Festival, Soy Chile, Soy Chile, Port Valparaíso, Soy Chile, Portal Portuario

27 May 2020

9th edition of the port research award launched in Tarragona (Spain). This prize is opened for researchers in social sciences that have done investigation in port history.

Port Tarragona (PDF)

27 May 2020

Port of Talcahuano reinforces its commitment with gender equality. The port will be the first public company of Chile to ratify the national NCh 3262 Gender Balance, Reconciliation of Work, Family and Personal Life.

Mas Container

27 May 2020

River transport: an alternative for eco-mobility. General manager of French Waterways (VNF) defends a modernization of the waterways to meet the challenges of sustainable logistics, since 1 barge in the Seine river could equal to 400 trucks in the periphery.

France Info

20 May 2020

Cleaning program for the Oslo ‘s Fjord shows positive results. The continued monitoring shows that the water and soil is cleaner, and new fauna is establishing itself in the seabed. This is the result of a coordinated work between port, city and other urban agencies.

Port of Oslo

20 May 2020

Port of Seattle develops a virtual Maritime Career awareness program for high school students. The program will educate teenagers about careers in the port and maritime industry.

Port of Seattle

20 May 2020

The fight against Covid-19 continues in Chilean Port Cities

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In past newsletters and interviews we have seen the major port cities of Chile, San Antonio and Valparaíso, have been very active against the effects of the Covid-19 in the local communities. Other smaller ports are also playing an important role to protect workers and citizens. In Arica, the port authority installed an isolation unit for workers that may have been infected. In Puerto Ventanas, the port organized a webinar about house hold measures to prevent the spreading of the coronavirus.

Portal Portuario – Arica, Portal Portuario – Puerto Ventanas

20 May 2020

Spanish ports against the Covid-19

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In Spain, the port of Cartagena has announced an investment of €100k for educational, cultural, sanitary and social projects close to the port environment. Also in Spain, the Port of Barcelona also announced that it will activate the maximum investments to accelerate the post Covid-19 recovery, prioritizing those considering the social, environmental and economic criteria. The Port of Santander has also decided to concede the Embarcadero Palace for solidarity action, from the regional food bank. In Valencia, the Port’s solidarity organization has also increased its actions, responding to the social demands, focusing on food donations. Finally, in the cultural agenda, the Port of Tarragona organized two online events, the “Un mar de peixos” and “Quiz”, including hands and crafts activities and competitions with children, and a quiz to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the port museum in the international days of Museums.

Diario el canal – Cartagena, Portal Portuario – Barcelona, Cantabria Liberal – Santander, Levante EMV –  Valencia, Port of Tarragona

20 May 2020

Economy and social support continues in Port Cities

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As in previous weeks, we are increasingly seeing new economic support programs for port companies, to protect employees. The Port of Venice announced that it will allow the suspension of the fees for all companies that operate in its territory, besides the terminal operators that were already protected by previous initiatives. In other countries like USA, the port of Corpus Christi has given a subsidy to a non-profit organization to provide micro-loans for small companies in the county. In France, HAROPA (Port Authority of Le Havre, Rouen and Paris), has released a port-Covid-19 support program to help companies to re-launch their activities. On another level, the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, is focusing on crew’s mental health. The Port Authority and Deltalinqs is encouraging the support to organizations active in the field. As mentioned in the previous newsletter, the situation of seafarers is becoming dramatic due to the delay of crew changes.

➜  Port of Venice, Portal Portuario – Corpus Christi, Port Strategy – HAROPA, Safety 4 Sea – Rotterdam

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Enterprise-driver Port

6 May 2020

Public investment and financial aid in port cities

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After the first wave of cultural and social initiatives, port cities around the globe are presenting their plans for the post-covid recovery. The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore has communicated a package of $27 million of financial support for companies, as well as for professionals training and employment support. In the USA, the ports of LA and Seattle have presented renewed infrastructural investments plan. In the case of LA, the port will invest $367million to reduce the impact on the local economy and employment, while in Seattle the plan includes $1.5billion in 20 projects, including also airport facilities. At the same time, in Spain, the ports of Valencia and Bilbao have followed a similar path. While in Valencia the port presented a financial aid package of €57,2 million to support local port companies, the port of Bilbao announced that their investment plan for 2020 will reach €67 million, to support the economy and employment creation.

➜  Safety4sea – Singapore, Safety4sea – Los Angeles, Port Technology – Seattle, Valencia Port, Bilbao Port

12 February 2020

The sustainable port is both smart and collective

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The CEOs of the ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam have laid out converging visions for the future development of their respective ports, one having just returned from the World Economic Forum, the other speaking about in an interview about forward-looking prospect for the port. Both agree that the fight against climate change and the need for a carbon-neutral port economy are absolutely crucial. Technological innovation, both onshore and offshore, and moves to optimise logistics chains, will of course form part of the solution. Beyond that, however, the success of these changes will depend on the ability of ports to forge new partnerships and work collectively, by bringing their communities together around a shared process of transformation.
Port of Rotterdam / Flows

12 February 2020

To ease congestion on the roads, the Port of Melbourne (Australia) has confirmed plans to develop its rail infrastructure (with a €16 million investment)

Port of Melbourne

12 February 2020

Kribi (Cameroon): first 31 businesses now setting up in the port zone, with another 150 set to follow.

EcoMatin

12 February 2020

Vlissingen – North Sea Port (Netherlands): first developments for the Borsele 1+2 offshore wind farm that will eventually provide power to a million homes

North Sea Port

29 January 2020

Major trends and scenarios for the evolution of logistics

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In the majority of port cities, logistics activity is increasingly structuring the territory. Marking out the future of this sector is becoming necessary. To this effect, the Urban Planning Agency of Marseille (France) remind us of a few key points. The massification of world trade flows will continue leading to the concentration of shipowners, the adaptation of ports, the extension and robotisation of warehouses, the emergence of single operators. In the era of e-commerce, the optimisation of the last mile has also become crucial. Nevertheless, land transport remains the weak link in this ecosystem with difficulties in massifying flows and proportionally a heavier CO2 impact. Pooling could be part of the answer but not all sectors believe in it. At the heart of these developments, the issue of employment appears to be an additional challenge for the territories.

Agam (pdf)

17 January 2020

Rwanda: Four ports on Lake Kivu earmarked as an alternative to road transport

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Lake Kivu in western Rwanda marks the border with the neighbouring DRC. The four ports will be built with the help of the Netherlands, and spread out from the north to the south of the lake. They will promote improved mobility for passengers and goods between the various districts along the bank. Within twenty years, they should handle the majority of commercial cross-border trade and some 3 million passengers. The Government is also keen to use the ports as a platform for more ambitious plans to kick-start water-based transport on other lakes and rivers in Rwanda. The aim is to reduce the use of onshore transport infrastructures, maintenance of which represents a significant portion of the national budget. Finally, the project will help to boost competitiveness for both the food industry (beer, tea, coffee) and the cement industry, while also giving a lift to the tourist sector.

The New times

17 January 2020

Whether fixed or floating, offshore wind power is now becoming truly industrialised. Cooperation between ports will need to be strengthened as a result.

Wind Europe

17 January 2020

Port of Montreal (Canada): fluid activities vital for combining economic efficiency and respect for the local population

Port de Montréal

10 December 2019

The transport and logistics industry faced with the environmental and energy challenge

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The sector currently accounts for 25% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency is one of the biggest ways to cut emissions. While there is a consensus on the need to gradually phase out fossil fuels, LNG is seen as a stepping stone, while in the longer term, making the right choice between hydrogen, ammonia and biofuels remains a key challenge. Another way to reduce emissions is intermodality, with the aim of reducing the proportion of goods moved by road, and increasing short distance transport by rail, river and sea. Finally, innovating for more efficient logistics is the third solution. The aim is to reduce overall energy use, while ensuring that emissions avoided at sea are not simply moved onshore, particularly as a result of increased congestion in port cities.

Diario del Puerto 1 / Diario del Puerto 2 / Diario del Puerto 3 / Diario del Puerto 4

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