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Urban Port

10 June 2013

Cherbourg: heat pump installed in the port’s commercial basin supplies 1,300 homes

Source : Le Monde

6 June 2013

Strasbourg: the old port warehouse will be built up three storeys higher!

Work is in progress on the Seegmuller warehouse. The addition of a rectangular space on three levels proposed by architects Georges Heintz and Anne-Sophie Kehr will allow the development of part of the planned residential construction. A less space-greedy solution for the programme on the “Malraux Peninsula”.
Source : Bâti Actu (+ images)

 

6 June 2013

Stockholm: a pilot city for green growth

With more than forty years’ commitment to environmental issues, Stockholm is aiming at Zero fossil fuel consumption by 2050. Today it is a model for the “Green Economy”, particularly through achievements in two port-city sectors: the Hammerby eco-district and the Royal Seaport. Detailed report
Source : City of Stockholm

 

6 June 2013

Calais (France) incorporates water transport into its public transport network

Source : Le Marin

6 June 2013

Rotterdam – Hô-Chi-Minh-City: cooperation agreement on climate change, particularly rising sea-levels

Source : Cities Today

5 June 2013

Toronto: landscape architecture for tomorrow’s city

Toronto’s population continues to grow and high rise buildings are springing up all over the city. To counteract this, the authorities are implementing a global strategy to preserve the quality of life. Landscape architecture is at the heart of this strategy, particularly along the waterfront.
Source : Huffington Post

5 June 2013

London: refurbishment of the marina in the three basins of St Katherine’s Docks

Source : Medberths

5 June 2013

Bordeaux: super-yachts and watersports for the “Bassins à flot”. Integration with residential building to be discussed

Source : 20 minutes

Citizen Port

21 October 2020

Port and City to work together for the development of the outer harbour in San Antonio

Portal Portuario

21 October 2020

Cleaning up the fjord in Oslo. Port works with companies and NGOs to help WWF in their fight against plastic in the oceans

Spleis

21 October 2020

How to invest in Human Capital?

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Providing personal developing opportunities is crucial for human capital development. There are numerous examples of port cities, where ports and universities work together to facilitate trainings and educational courses to the employees. In Buenos Aires, Argentina, the port just signed a new agreement with the Economic Sciences Faculty of the local University, to allow as well new research cooperation. In Rotterdam we can find other examples of this kind, such as the cooperation between the port and the Erasmus University. In a similar way, the Mauritius Ports Authority has signed a new protocol with the University of Mauritius to created new training programmes that will allow port employees to expand their careers. Other agreements may also support port workers differently, as in the protocol signed between the port of Valparaiso and SENDA in Chile, to prevent drugs and alcohol abuse.

Education is also fundamental to reduce inequalities and increase the diversity of port workers. For that purpose, the Port Authority of New South Wales has launched a new training program designed for Indigenous women, partnering with the not-for-profit organization Tribal Warrior. The port also sponsors the Deck Cadet Program to help young seafarers to kickstart their career. Indeed, engaging younger generations in port city activities is a necessary for developing the local human capital. For that reason, this kind of programs or other initiatives are becoming more common. Another example is the internship program by the Bilbao Puerto y Ría Foundation designed for young graduates. All these efforts only make sense if there are ways to couple job offers and demands, in order to facilitate this, Talent in de Haven 2.0 will take place in Antwerp to facilitate the match between companies and job seekers.

Port of Buenos Aires, Erasmus University, Mauritius Ports, Port of Valparaiso, Port Authority NSW, Deck Cadet, La Vanguardia – Bilbao, Talent in de Haven

21 October 2020

Different ways to discover the port

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During the coming weeks, AIVP will focus on port city culture. There are many different ways to enhance the port identity as we have seen recently. In Antwerp, the Havenland Run & Walk 2020 edition will allow participants to run or hike along the Rietveld Kallo nature reserve, viewing the port. The event will take place on November 7th and 8th, adapted with “corona-proof” safety measures. Another example to discover the waterfront can be found in San Diego, USA, where the port is highlighting the arts and culture program, with a series of self-guided tours to experience the art locations. In Fremantle, Australia, the port is organizing free port walks, with the help of volunteers enrolled in a new program, to better educate the public about port operations and the history of Victoria Quay. Another way to culturally link port and city is supporting local initiatives, as the port of Huelva in Spain is doing, collaborating with Ibero-American Film Festival.

Havenland, Port of San Diego, Fremantle Port Walks, Fremantle volunteer program, Diario de Huelva, Image from Havenland

14 October 2020

The new NextGen District in Antwerp (Belgium) will become a hub for innovative companies, from start-ups to industry leaders, in the field of circular economics

Port of Antwerp

14 October 2020

The Port Sustainability Plan from Port Authority of New South Wales (Australia) wins Good Design Award. The plan, co-created with employees, defines a framework for sustainable initiatives in four main areas: people, operations, environment and communities

Port Authority of New South Wales

14 October 2020

Taking gender equality seriously in port cities

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The presence of women in the maritime world is no longer novelty, and their contribution is a crucial added value for ports. This was the main message from the Minister of Women and Gender Equity of Chile in her visit to the port of San Antonio. However, there is still a long way to go. For that reason, three Argentinian ports have launched initiative addressing gender issues. The Dock Sud port and the Port of Buenos Aires have created commissions on gender perspective in accordance with the ministry’s directives. The port of Bahía Blanca has developed an action protocol for situations of gender violence. The main objective is to define the actions to be taken in situations of discrimination and/or gender violence against women and people from the LGTBIQ+ collective, guaranteeing a work environment of trust, security and respect for people’s rights.

Empresa Oceano, La Ciudad Avellaneda, Puerto Buenos Aires, Puerto Bahía Blanca

14 October 2020

Port Culture: the foundation for social integration of ports

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As we will see during the next month, disclosing port city culture is crucial for the social integration of ports. Events such as the Italian Port Days form last week can bring the population close to the port. The second edition of this event organized by Assoporti was supported by many Italian port authorities that hosted open days or cultural activities. In the case of Genoa, the festival Zones Portuaires contributed to the celebration of port city culture with concerts, exhibitions and debates, including one webinar with the participation of AIVP. In other port cities similar initiatives are taking place, like in Viana do Castelo (Portugal), but this time virtually due to the limitations imposed for the Covid-19.

Italian Port Days, Assoporti (PDF), Zones Portuaires, Port of Viana

14 October 2020

Mobility in port cities: different approaches to a complex problem

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One of the challenges for port-city relationships is managing the impact of port traffic in urban areas. To address this issue, the port of San Diego (USA) has presented the plan “Harbor Drive 2.0.” to keep trucks out of local neighbourhoods. The port will collaborate with the San Diego Association of Governments, and the California Department of Transportation to create a dedicated road for trucks. The plan also calls for better sidewalks, bike lanes and mass transit stops. Other solutions to make port city mobility more sustainable are based on river transport. One example is London, where express delivery companies are combining it with bicycles for the last mile. In Paris and Lisbon we can find examples of river passenger traffic using electric boats, both for leisure and commuting. Electromobility has been one of the main solutions many port cities are considering, as it is also happening in Aveiro (Portugal), where the port with new charging stations. Other cases are going one step further and testing new transport methods, such as drones, as we saw in Rotterdam (The Netherlands) some days ago.

Port of San Diego – KPBS, DHL, Paris – NPI, Lisbon – Eco Sapo, Aveiro – Revista Cargo, Port of Rotterdam

14 October 2020

The importance of food and port cities

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This years’ Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the Word Food Program for its efforts to end hunger and provide quality food. Port Cities play a key in the distribution of food for all, as we saw this week with the new agreement between the port of San Antonio (Chile) and the local fishermen collectives to support sustainable fishing techniques. The discussion about food will continue, particularly this week when FAO celebrates the World Food Day. There will be several events such as the Food Talks in Valencia (Spain), in Las Naves of La Marina.

Nobel Prize, Portal Portuario, FAO, Food talks , Image Chile Sustentable

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Enterprise-driver Port

21 October 2020

The Ruakura logistics hub (New Zealand) will include a 10 hectare area of wetland to offset environmental impacts

Voxy

21 October 2020

Swedish company Wallenius Marine is set to launch the biggest wind-powered RoRo vessel ever built

CNN (travel)

21 October 2020

ValenciaPort will accompany Callao (Peru), Valparaiso (Chile) and Kingston (Jamaica) in the field of smart technologies

Spanish Ports

Canal du Mozambique
21 October 2020

The Indian Ocean: central to the energy transition with LNG?

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With the mega-ship CMA-CGM Jacques Saadé now in service, the use of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel for seagoing vessels is now a reality. This 23,000 TEU ship’s propulsion systems are powered by LNG, an energy source that allows a 20 to 40% reduction in CO2 emissions, and also emits low levels of sulphur oxides and fine particulate matter. The Mozambique Canal boasts vast LNG resources that could drive this energy transition, and the port cities of the Indian Ocean are preparing for the revolution. One example is Longoni (Mayotte, France), which is redeveloping as a support base for the industry. On the other side of the Canal, the terminals at Durban (South Africa) are being upgraded to handle LNG. Demand is high, with India expressing an interest in this cleaner form of energy. A substantial volume of LNG extracted will pass through Indian ports. Meanwhile, Total is maintaining its major investment (13 billion euros) in the province of Cabo Delgado (Mozambique), despite attacks by terrorist groups in Mocimboa da Praia. The company is also set to collaborate with Siemens on LNG turbines.

➜ L’Antenne ; CMA CGM Group ; Le Journal de Mayotte ; Mayotte 1ère ; GreenPort ; Kallanish Energy ; World Oil

14 October 2020

North Sea Port (Netherlands): Yara launches a plant producing ammonia for use as a marine fuel

Info Chimie

14 October 2020

In Durban (South Africa), the company Maersk is investing in refrigerated food storage

Steel Guru ; Fruit Net 

blockchain-smart-ports
14 October 2020

AI and “smart” technologies, for greener and more efficient port cities?

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According to recent studies, the “smart port” market is set to be worth 14 billion dollars by 2027. Artificial intelligence, automation, blockchain, and the Internet of Things all offer possibilities for improving the efficiency of port installations. Incidentally, AIVP has previously touched on these issues in an interview for the European programme “Speed”.
The port of Rotterdam (Netherlands) has created a coalition to develop AI, which includes the Muncipality of Rotterdam, InnovationQuarter, Netherlands Maritime Technology and TU Delft university. Blockchain is among the priority technologies, as seen with the “Distro” platform, also in the Netherlands, which allows electricity to be bought and sold via blockchain. In Busan (South Korea), the City Authorities have signed a MoU with the Port, universities and a technology centre to develop smart technologies as part of the South Korean Government’s “Digital New Deal” strategy. These technologies are also being developed through competitive events such as “Hackathons”. One such event took place on 14 October, organised by Ports de Lille (France) in partnership with the “Speed” programme, on the “digital and environmental revolution”.

PR Newswire ; Smart port ecosystem (1) ; Hellenic shipping news ; Port of Rotterdam (website) ; Port of Busan (press release) ; Smart port ecosystem (2)

Navire à hydrogène
7 October 2020

Green hydrogen: a future energy source for port cities?

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The future seems to lie with “green” hydrogen, made from non-fossil based electricity. It would require a virtuous chain between renewable energies and hydrogen production plants, to which city-port ecosystems are particularly suited.
In that vein, the Port of Bordeaux (France) has signed an agreement to develop a green hydrogen production industry locally. It is a similar story in Bilbao (Spain), where the port authority has given the go-ahead for construction of one of the world’s largest green hydrogen plants.
These industries are often organised in the form of hubs like the one at Port Kembla (New South Wales Port Authority, Australia, helping to stimulate the local economy.
Mass-produced hydrogen could power ships and help to improve the environmental footprint of maritime shipping. To that end, some companies are researching hydrogen-based propulsion systems, including Engie and ArianeGroup which have joined forces. Prototypes of hydrogen engines are even now being tested by the Italian company Fincantieri.
There is a real market for this new fuel, as can be seen with the agreement that will see Portugal supply green hydrogen to the Port of Rotterdam, which needs the resource for its future operations.

7 October 2020

The port of Bilbao (Spain) is developing artificial intelligence to better identify hazardous goods

El Estrecho Digital

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