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Urban Port

17 April 2019

Saint-Nazaire (France): plans for the pumping station unveiled

The Port of Nantes Saint-Nazaire, the City and Agglomeration of Saint-Nazaire, and the ADDRN, have selected the project designed by Barré-Lambot and B2A for this iconic site located in the outer harbor area of Saint-Nazaire. It will host a brewery, a bar-restaurant and conference spaces. A six-storey luxury hotel will be built nearby, offering superb views from its roof terrace.

Full article : Nantes Saint-Nazaire Port ; Actu (+ images) ; Ville de Saint-Nazaire (+ images)

17 April 2019

Melbourne: an area of the Docklands could be turned into a biodiversity hotspot

Full article : Docklands news

17 April 2019

The port of Papeete has begun on work to develop public spaces and two maritime-themed buildings on the waterfront

Full article : TNTV

17 April 2019

San Diego (USA): after failing to find a viable operator, the City hands the Port responsibility for running the National City Aquatic Center

Full article : San Diego Union-Tribune

15 April 2019

Seattle (USA): invitation to tender for a new cruise terminal on the site of terminal 46

The project will need to address the port’s key requirements for cruise activity, which include not just functionality, but also integrating the facility with adjacent districts, mitigating environmental impacts, generating economic and cultural benefits for the community, especially regional tribes, minorities, women, etc.

Full article : Port of Seattle ; RFQ

15 April 2019

The President of the Port of Motril (Spain) wants to reorganise the port spaces to promote better City-Port integration

Full article : Ideal

15 April 2019

Yokohama (Japan): plans for an aerial tramway over the Minato Mirai 21 waterfront district, in preparation for the Tokyo Olympics

Full article : Asahi

15 April 2019

Greenock (UK): plans for a cruise terminal that will also include a visitor centre, art gallery and restaurant

Full article : Greenock Telegraph

10 April 2019

Istanbul, Galataport: modern art museum and innovative cruise terminal

Currently under construction, the Renzo Piano-designed museum will be one of the centerpieces of Galataport, a redevelopment of 1.2 km of waterfront, the masterplan for which was created by Dror+Gensler. It also includes a ground-breaking cruise terminal, with a system of hydraulic gangways, designed with BEA, which can be stowed in the basement when not in use, freeing up space for the promenade.

Full article : RenzoPiano Museum ; Word Architecture News ; Cruise and Ferry ; Video Galaport project

 

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Citizen Port

22 August 2013

Long Beach: the port has reduced its emissions of diesel particles by 81% since 2005

Source : Green Port

24 July 2013

Waterways – a sector looking to recruit but lacking applicants

The magazine Navigation Ports & Intermodalité presents a complete file on young people and waterways. This sector needs to provide a new vision of its industry and the opportunities for development which it offers. Reflections, testimonies and training opportunities will be presented.

Source: NPI

19 July 2013

The film “Cargo” takes a prize at the Genova Film Festival dedicated to the theme : Today’s port – between local identity and global networks

Source : Porto di Genova

18 July 2013

“Aportem – Port of Valencia United” sees the light of day

Valence_gm_APORTEM_12_07_2013The Aportem project has been officially launched by various partners from the logistics and port community of Valencia.  Initiated by the Port Authority and Valenciaport, it aims to promote corporate social responsibility. (©APV)

Source: Port de Valence – Valenciaport

17 July 2013

In Ghent, free boat trips are a victim of their own success: The port is already taking bookings for 2014

Source: Port de Gand

17 July 2013

A unique multimedia aquatic show in Quebec could inspire port cities

Source: BateauInfo

17 July 2013

Every port should have a festival: Antwerp organizes Drakenboot Festival for September 2013

Source: Port d’Anvers

16 July 2013

Synthesis AIVP Days Helsinki : “Culture and competitiveness of port cities

Announcing the creation of cultural infrastructure in port spaces which are still active, or in the process of conversion, often provokes arguments and disagreements between the players concerned, and also the population.

Are cultural installations essential to the success of the port-city relationship?

Disputes are even more open in a context of local or national economic crisis. This was the case in Iceland in 2008 when the construction of the Harpa Concert Hall at the port-city interface of Reykjavik was launched. Investing so heavily in this type of infrastructure appears risky to many, and at all events not a high priority.

The feedback from the latest AIVP Meeting shows that in the long term this kind of bet on the future does pay. It has a positive impact on the quality of life, turning these sites into attractions which draw thousands of visitors, and places where people want to live. They also strengthen relations and cooperation between the parties involved.

Furthermore, in addition to the specific buildings, the challenge is also to bring new life to a whole territory, and to construct communities. This can be achieved by supporting the creation of “culture districts”, as in Reykjavik or Buenos Aires. Thus particular attention is paid to the quality of public spaces to favour the adoption of the new infrastructure by the population. The Spanish example of Malaga is enlightening in this respect, with the creation of a circuit round the cultural infrastructure which already existed in the city centre and the new infrastructure created on the waterfront. New links are forged, a new port-city weft is created. Appropriation by the population becomes possible thanks to the creation of a single port-city public space and a common imaginary.

At Veracruz, in Mexico, the need for a port extension must also be based on maritime culture, a culture of the sea. This enables the citizen to understand that port growth is not only an economic asset, but also contributes to the social and cultural development of the community.

Supporting the creation of a port culture or supporting the acceptance of port-city development or redevelopment projects – in the end the challenge of cultural infrastructure is the same for the decision-makers, whether for the city or the port.

 

Enhancing the port-city image: the port as an inspiration for architects

In a sense, the competition launched by the port of Piraeus in Greece for the reconversion of the silos into a museum is also a longer term strategic investment. Its aim is to achieve social acceptance of the presence of the port and an improvement in its relations with the city, to change the image of a port which is perceived as a barrier.

The benefits expected from the installation of high quality cultural infrastructure and public spaces here are of course associated with the fact that the passenger port is just next door, and that cruise activity is growing rapidly. The architects decided to open the building to the outside and provide views over the active port. References to the industrial past are also used in the treatment of public spaces to assert the identity of the site.

Taking inspiration from port architecture and exploiting it while respecting the logic of the site is the principle followed also in Marseilles for the various ambitious works of cultural infrastructure which have been carried out along the port-city interface. These projects have been conceived specifically as a function of the unique spirit of the location. Here port architecture becomes a tool by which identity asserts itself against the risk of standardisation. In the case of Marseilles, it is also a question of strengthening its strategic positioning on the international scene.

According to Marta Moretti, the emergence of this problem of identity, of the use of port vocabulary and memories of the city’s port history as opportunities for the creation of a new identity, is characteristic of the second generation of waterfront projects. The economic crisis appears to have brought about a change of attitude, insisting more on the re-use and exploitation of abandoned urban infrastructure. This change is a particular feature of the waterfront redevelopment operations of Northern Europe. Here, the opportunity is taken to re-think the waterfront while paying more attention to the question of sustainability and the importance of public spaces.

 

Citizens, partners in port performance

Port performance now is additionally measured by the degree of knowledge that a territory has of its own industrial and economic tissue. This is especially true in the case of a port-city, which often suffers from the negative and sometimes false image which its own citizens have. How then can a society be constructed which is able to contribute to economic development on the basis of its own identity?

For Hakan Fagerström (Tallink Ferry Company), the emergence of a port culture may have a positive influence on the local economic tissue of the port, but only so long as it is adopted by all the players of the port-city. The need, for economic reasons, to remain in the heart of Helsinki is particularly important for passenger transport companies, whose customers do not like to arrive in a no-man’s-land.

And it is just as important for the city to safeguard activities compatible with urban uses and to offer a berth to ships which demonstrate international trade over the port. According to Pascal Freneau of the Port of Nantes in France, ports are among the elements which structure the world, and comprehension of how trade functions is to be encouraged.

Likewise the Israeli port of Ashdod, since the port was modernised in 2005, has decided to redefine its business strategy and basic values by trying to improve its image and its relationship with the public. This step is born of the conviction that collaboration with the community and its principal institutions is an essential value for a port authority sometimes faced with a difficult social dialogue.

The creation of a Port Centre is one of the measures adopted to give back a certain pride to port workers, and in turn to show the population and the community of Ashdod the different activities and careers offered by the port. It is also a meeting point allowing the port to open its doors and show potential investors the interest shown in the territory by the various communities, institutions and companies. Its attractiveness is strengthened by a local dynamic which invests in the development of a shared port culture.

 

ISPS code, restricted spaces: how to create and manage cultural events in the port environment

For Jean-François Driant, Director of a major cultural infrastructure at Le Havre in France, “There is nothing that looks so like a scene in a theatre as a port basin.” The port is a tremendous vehicle for an imaginary. The only difficulty is to find a common space in which to translate this imaginary while respecting the constraints of artistic creation and the needs of port operations.

The debate underlined the fact that the ISPS Code seems particularly difficult for port authorities to get round, as was shown by the example of Guadeloupe, subjected to pressure and control by the neighbouring United States. As Harald Jaeger, CEO of the port of Valparaiso in Chile remarked, security is an asset for a port, a value to be protected. It would take many years to recover lost cruise ship passengers after an attack. For all that, the 15 years’ experience of Valparaiso, with many initiatives in the cultural, sporting, recreational, etc. fields, show that temporary partial opening of the port (10 days per year) is possible. Contributions from the floor: according to the President of the port of Bahia Blanca in Argentina, one idea is to create specific corridors inside the port, which could be financed by incorporating the cost into port dues. At Malaga, after three years of discussion, access to the wharves when there are no cruise ships in port may be possible in future.

Flexibility seems to be the key word, including being open to events generating up to a million visitors, like the Tall Ships Races. An event which, apart from the immediate benefits for the city, had a double positive impact: strengthening cooperation between city and port players, and generating financing which can subsequently be re-injected into port-city redevelopment projects.

Constructing continuity between city and port, creating an identity and reinforcing culture and the local community, in the long run is a formidable lever for economic and social development which can irrigate an entire territory.

 

AIVP Days Helsinki June 2013 : Presentations available here

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Enterprise-driver Port

17 April 2019

Los Angeles / San Pedro: Container business growth boosts office real estate needed for support and research services

Full article: GlobeSt

17 April 2019

Perth Fremantle: Port lands available for industry and logistics are scarce and sell quickly

Full article: The Sydney Morning Herald

17 April 2019

Canal Seine Nord Europe: To avoid any delay, the French Government should provide funding soon

Full article: NPI

15 April 2019

More and more ports are looking to kick-start innovation through industrial clusters

There are a host of projects in this area, including PierNext in Barcelona, RDM Campus and MH4 in Rotterdam, the Smart Port City programme in Le Havre, the COVE project in Halifax, and others. For Maurice Jansen, the aim is the same: to orchestrate collaborative innovation and converge financial, social, human and cultural capital.

Full article: Port Strategy

15 April 2019

Artificial power generation islands in the North Sea: projects continue to move forward with a test site potentially to be created within five years

Full article: Recharge Wind

15 April 2019

Green Deliriver: a new river-based urban logistics pilot project in Paris to meet the needs of e-commerce and the construction industry.

Full article: Voxlog

15 April 2019

Study of port governance and the cruise sector: four standard models and an overall trend towards multi-party management of facilities

Full article: Port Economics

10 April 2019

The EIB grants a 90 million euro loan to the Brittany region for the planned renewable marine energy terminal at the port of Brest

Full article: La Tribune

8 April 2019

Future governance of the Antwerp / Zeebrugge port complex: all options still open for finding the right balance

Full article: Flows

8 April 2019

Thessaloniki: for the port’s CEO, the relationship between City and Port is now a success, especially in terms of culture

Full article : ESPO

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