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Urban Port

21 February 2018

Dun Laoghaire: the port launches a CALL FOR TENDERS for Carlisle Pier

The site, covering 1.1 hectares, is located in the historic waterfront sector. It is currently used for car-parking and the port occasionally takes it over for discharge of unusual cargoes or cruise ship berthing, or for international regattas. The redevelopment proposals must be for predominantly cultural use, ensure permeability with the city, and allow improved public access to the waterfront.

Full article : Afloat

21 February 2018

Lorient: plans for a 3.3 megawatt solar farm (capable of providing power to 1000 homes) on the roof of the submarine base by 2019

Full article : Ouest France

21 February 2018

Mumbai: cruise facilities on the Eastern Waterfront will be inspired by Miami

Full article : Times of India

21 February 2018

Liverpool: work begins on project to open up views of the Stanley Flight, an important part of the port’s golden age

Full article : The Guide Liverpool

16 February 2018

Hong Kong: flats over the container terminal?

This is one of the solutions being studied by the government to meet the strong pressure for housing. The other option would be to relocate the terminal concerned, Kwai Tsing Container Terminal, which currently handles 80% of the territory’s traffic. For the Managing Director, the first option is worth considering and technically feasible. It could provide housing for tens of thousands of people. Relocating the 380-hectare terminal, on the other hand, raises the difficulty of finding an alternative site. A joint port-city solution which is unprecedented to say the least! It will be proposed to the public in March.

Full article : South China Morning Post

16 February 2018

Santander: development of public spaces around the passenger terminal will start this spring

Full article : El Diario

16 February 2018

Melbourne Docklands: reflections and an exhibition by RMIT students on a zero carbon future for Victoria Harbour

Full article : Docklands news

16 February 2018

Marseilles: the five historic cranes of the Digue du Large sea wall are finally being preserved

Full article : La marseillaise

14 February 2018

Oulu (Finland): images of PAVE architects’ 2014 project to turn grain silos into housing

Full article : ArchDaily (+ images, plans)

14 February 2018

Sète: the port will seek consultation on the project to accommodate large yachts, which has given rise to much discussion

Full article : La Dépêche

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Citizen Port

21 February 2018

Guayaquil: agreement between the Port and Department of Education to create a Technological Institute

According to the government, a trained technical workforce is crucial to the future of port cities in the 21st century. Guayaquil, home to the country’s biggest port, will host the new institute, providing an environment conducive to training, innovation and study of future challenges, with the construction of a deep water port and the decision to retain the naval yards.

Full article: eltelegrafo.com

21 February 2018

In the Port of Antwerp – l’écluse de Royers- bikes will be separated from car traffic

Full article: Port of Antwerp

21 February 2018

The theme of the ESPO Award 2018 is “Creating a good working environment for everyone in the port”

Full article: ESPO

19 February 2018

Tauranga (New Zealand): how can a sustainable cruise tourism policy be implemented?

The tourism development agency is currently questioning the growing number of cruise ship passengers arriving in their territory. How can they maintain a balance while responding to the expectations of both the cruise ship passengers and the local population? To inform her decision, the agency’s director considers that much more precise knowledge of the data on visitor arrivals and the associated financial flows is required.

Full article: Sunlive

19 February 2018

The Port of Bordeaux launches PowerPort BOX: a mobile power supply module for river vessels

Full article: Mer et Marine

19 February 2018

Port of San Diego terminals invest in smart technologies to fight pollution

Full article: Greenport

14 February 2018

Hong Kong: being a leading maritime metropolis still requires a prosperous port

Full article: China Daily

14 February 2018

The wahoo effect plays a role for port employees. We look at the Kalmar example

Full article: Kalmar Global

14 February 2018

Lorient: winter port circuits to learn about the region’s maritime economic identity

Full article: CCSTI

12 February 2018

France: what does the future hold for the sea and the coastline?

The State has set up a participative platform for members of the public to obtain information and submit their views on the future vision proposed for each of the country’s coastlines, in order to ensure the right ecological balance and maximise economic and social benefits from the sea and coast.

Full article: Mer Littoral + Magazine Environnement

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Enterprise-driver Port

22 July 2013

Sogaris posted a 93% occupation rate in its warehouses on its urban logistics platforms. Sogaris is a member of AIVP.

Source : L’Antenne

22 July 2013

With strong growth of 20% since 2010, the port of Civitavecchia aims to create employment and added value thanks to its new terminals

Source : WK Transport Logistique

22 July 2013

An atlas to support the creation of an East-West goods transport corridor in Europe

This atlas, produced by the European Weastflows project, describes the flow of goods in north-west Europe, the transport infrastructure available by mode, and the projects in progress. Linked to a GIS, it will allow congestion points to be identified in order to optimise freight traffic movement and modal shift.
Atlas conception : Agence d’Urbanisme de la Région du Havre et de l’Estuaire de la Seine (AURH)
Source : weastflows, sustainable logistics for Europe
Blog : www.aurhinweastflows.com

22 July 2013

The Ukraine approved long-term port development strategy : a capacity of 250 Mt and a creating of 15000 jobs

Source : RZD-partner.com

22 July 2013

After 5 years of research, JOC publishes its classification of the most productive container ports: the rankings are dominated by Asian ports

Fuente: Journal of Commerce

19 July 2013

Roadbridges or canals: the Atlantic-Pacific link in Central America at the heart of 4 projects

Source : The Loadster

19 July 2013

The State of North Rhine-Westphalia announces that the port of Duisburg shall not face privatisation

According to the State, “a matter of such common concern cannot be subject to private investment driven by often unknown motivations”.  The State has therefore decided to become majority shareholder by purchasing the share held by the federal government. The final third still belongs to the City of Duisburg.

Source : Focus.de

19 July 2013

In Dunkirk, the COTER Commission, part of the European Union’s Committee of the Regions, debates ports’ contribution to the “Europe 2020 Strategy”

Source : Newspress

17 July 2013

Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Budapest, Vienna and Pisa: reappropriation of the river for logistical use

Since 2011 and the “Connecting with waterways: a capital choice” charter, these port cities have been aiming at CO2-free urban logistics by 2030. Innovations in river transport and respect for the environment should satisfy the needs of the 80% of Europeans who will be city-dwellers in 2050.
Source : Greenport

16 July 2013

Synthesis AIVP Days Helsinki : “Culture and competitiveness of port cities

Announcing the creation of cultural infrastructure in port spaces which are still active, or in the process of conversion, often provokes arguments and disagreements between the players concerned, and also the population.

Are cultural installations essential to the success of the port-city relationship?

Disputes are even more open in a context of local or national economic crisis. This was the case in Iceland in 2008 when the construction of the Harpa Concert Hall at the port-city interface of Reykjavik was launched. Investing so heavily in this type of infrastructure appears risky to many, and at all events not a high priority.

The feedback from the latest AIVP Meeting shows that in the long term this kind of bet on the future does pay. It has a positive impact on the quality of life, turning these sites into attractions which draw thousands of visitors, and places where people want to live. They also strengthen relations and cooperation between the parties involved.

Furthermore, in addition to the specific buildings, the challenge is also to bring new life to a whole territory, and to construct communities. This can be achieved by supporting the creation of “culture districts”, as in Reykjavik or Buenos Aires. Thus particular attention is paid to the quality of public spaces to favour the adoption of the new infrastructure by the population. The Spanish example of Malaga is enlightening in this respect, with the creation of a circuit round the cultural infrastructure which already existed in the city centre and the new infrastructure created on the waterfront. New links are forged, a new port-city weft is created. Appropriation by the population becomes possible thanks to the creation of a single port-city public space and a common imaginary.

At Veracruz, in Mexico, the need for a port extension must also be based on maritime culture, a culture of the sea. This enables the citizen to understand that port growth is not only an economic asset, but also contributes to the social and cultural development of the community.

Supporting the creation of a port culture or supporting the acceptance of port-city development or redevelopment projects – in the end the challenge of cultural infrastructure is the same for the decision-makers, whether for the city or the port.

 

Enhancing the port-city image: the port as an inspiration for architects

In a sense, the competition launched by the port of Piraeus in Greece for the reconversion of the silos into a museum is also a longer term strategic investment. Its aim is to achieve social acceptance of the presence of the port and an improvement in its relations with the city, to change the image of a port which is perceived as a barrier.

The benefits expected from the installation of high quality cultural infrastructure and public spaces here are of course associated with the fact that the passenger port is just next door, and that cruise activity is growing rapidly. The architects decided to open the building to the outside and provide views over the active port. References to the industrial past are also used in the treatment of public spaces to assert the identity of the site.

Taking inspiration from port architecture and exploiting it while respecting the logic of the site is the principle followed also in Marseilles for the various ambitious works of cultural infrastructure which have been carried out along the port-city interface. These projects have been conceived specifically as a function of the unique spirit of the location. Here port architecture becomes a tool by which identity asserts itself against the risk of standardisation. In the case of Marseilles, it is also a question of strengthening its strategic positioning on the international scene.

According to Marta Moretti, the emergence of this problem of identity, of the use of port vocabulary and memories of the city’s port history as opportunities for the creation of a new identity, is characteristic of the second generation of waterfront projects. The economic crisis appears to have brought about a change of attitude, insisting more on the re-use and exploitation of abandoned urban infrastructure. This change is a particular feature of the waterfront redevelopment operations of Northern Europe. Here, the opportunity is taken to re-think the waterfront while paying more attention to the question of sustainability and the importance of public spaces.

 

Citizens, partners in port performance

Port performance now is additionally measured by the degree of knowledge that a territory has of its own industrial and economic tissue. This is especially true in the case of a port-city, which often suffers from the negative and sometimes false image which its own citizens have. How then can a society be constructed which is able to contribute to economic development on the basis of its own identity?

For Hakan Fagerström (Tallink Ferry Company), the emergence of a port culture may have a positive influence on the local economic tissue of the port, but only so long as it is adopted by all the players of the port-city. The need, for economic reasons, to remain in the heart of Helsinki is particularly important for passenger transport companies, whose customers do not like to arrive in a no-man’s-land.

And it is just as important for the city to safeguard activities compatible with urban uses and to offer a berth to ships which demonstrate international trade over the port. According to Pascal Freneau of the Port of Nantes in France, ports are among the elements which structure the world, and comprehension of how trade functions is to be encouraged.

Likewise the Israeli port of Ashdod, since the port was modernised in 2005, has decided to redefine its business strategy and basic values by trying to improve its image and its relationship with the public. This step is born of the conviction that collaboration with the community and its principal institutions is an essential value for a port authority sometimes faced with a difficult social dialogue.

The creation of a Port Centre is one of the measures adopted to give back a certain pride to port workers, and in turn to show the population and the community of Ashdod the different activities and careers offered by the port. It is also a meeting point allowing the port to open its doors and show potential investors the interest shown in the territory by the various communities, institutions and companies. Its attractiveness is strengthened by a local dynamic which invests in the development of a shared port culture.

 

ISPS code, restricted spaces: how to create and manage cultural events in the port environment

For Jean-François Driant, Director of a major cultural infrastructure at Le Havre in France, “There is nothing that looks so like a scene in a theatre as a port basin.” The port is a tremendous vehicle for an imaginary. The only difficulty is to find a common space in which to translate this imaginary while respecting the constraints of artistic creation and the needs of port operations.

The debate underlined the fact that the ISPS Code seems particularly difficult for port authorities to get round, as was shown by the example of Guadeloupe, subjected to pressure and control by the neighbouring United States. As Harald Jaeger, CEO of the port of Valparaiso in Chile remarked, security is an asset for a port, a value to be protected. It would take many years to recover lost cruise ship passengers after an attack. For all that, the 15 years’ experience of Valparaiso, with many initiatives in the cultural, sporting, recreational, etc. fields, show that temporary partial opening of the port (10 days per year) is possible. Contributions from the floor: according to the President of the port of Bahia Blanca in Argentina, one idea is to create specific corridors inside the port, which could be financed by incorporating the cost into port dues. At Malaga, after three years of discussion, access to the wharves when there are no cruise ships in port may be possible in future.

Flexibility seems to be the key word, including being open to events generating up to a million visitors, like the Tall Ships Races. An event which, apart from the immediate benefits for the city, had a double positive impact: strengthening cooperation between city and port players, and generating financing which can subsequently be re-injected into port-city redevelopment projects.

Constructing continuity between city and port, creating an identity and reinforcing culture and the local community, in the long run is a formidable lever for economic and social development which can irrigate an entire territory.

 

AIVP Days Helsinki June 2013 : Presentations available here

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