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10 December 2018

Hobart (Tasmania): what future for the waterfront?

This review of the history of the Hobart waterfront redevelopment recalls how the transformation of the old port gave rise to multiple projects and debates. The same is true of a project proposed this year by Cumulus Studio, including an outdoor swimming-pool, a market and a maritime museum. The most recent project, by landscape architect Michael Haynes, aims to return priority to pedestrians and public spaces.

Full article : ABC ; ArchitectureAU – Cumulus project

10 December 2018

Rotterdam: a spiraling belvedere above a historic warehouse designed by MAD architects

Full article : Design boom

10 December 2018

Kolkata: the port is to commission a consultant for the redevelopment of more than 120 hectares, with a logistics hub and tourism complex

Full article : Realty Economic Times

10 December 2018

Santander receives an award from the Caminos Foundation for the urban regeneration of the waterfront and its bay

Full article : El Mundo

5 December 2018

Corunna: thousands visit an exhibition on 10 European cities which have converted parts of their port zones

These 10 models give an idea of what could be done at Corunna. All these port cities chose to organise international competitions to give their projects coherence through an overall plan. The solutions adopted vary, depending either on the diversity of the new uses introduced, the type of management adopted, the choice to build emblematic buildings (frequently the case), the uses given to water and the old docks, or the priority given to pedestrian promenades. Visitors were invited to vote for their favourite: Amsterdam was the winner.

Full article : La Voz de Galicia (+ images) + the 10 examples

5 December 2018

Strasbourg: redevelopment of the rue du port du Rhin for a better bridge between the city and the port

Full article : Strasbourg Port

5 December 2018

Adelaide: a historic warehouse will finally be demolished because of its dilapidated state. Others on the same site will be given new uses

Full article : InDaily

5 December 2018

Melbourne: public consultation on plans for a new park at North Wharf in the Docklands

Full article : Participate Melbourne

3 December 2018

Marseille, Euroméditerranée: temporary site occupancy strategy

Euroméditerranée has launched a call for expressions of interest for nine sites yet to be allocated in the port hinterland zone. The aim is to host economic or cultural activities there for between one and five years. The strategy is also intended to enable current and future residents and users to reclaim the site in redevelopment.

Full article : Euroméditerranée ; Move

3 December 2018

Copenhagen, Urban Rigger project: containers transformed into 12 floating student dwellings to be completed by the addition of 60 more in 2019

Full article : IAU ; video

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Citizen Port

5 December 2018

Buenos Aires: mural frescos to give new life to the Sand Terminal

Argentina’s flora and fauna have inspired the artists in this programme to recover buildings and sand silos which have been abandoned for years. The programme is part of the current project for F Dock, which will be converted into a riverside promenade. However, the manager responsible for the Port’s project stresses that the idea is for the Sand Terminal’s equipment to be brought back into use as well, as it can play an essential role in construction work around the city.
Full article : La Nacion (+ images)

5 December 2018

Kiel: a pollution measurement campaign suggests that cruise ships are not the main cause

Full article: Greenport

5 December 2018

The inland port of Goole will become self-sufficient in electricity, thanks to photovoltaic power. Other ABP ports are following the experiment closely.

Full article: Hull Live

5 December 2018

Seattle: the five-year port plan (US$348 M) pays special attention to energy and environmental issues and to relationships with the community

Full article: Port Strategy

3 December 2018

La “New York Harbour School” has declared his intention to reintroduce oysters in the port to improve water quality

Full article: Market Screener

3 December 2018

Alaska starts a training programme to involve citizens from all walks of life in reflection on the potential of the blue economy

Full article: Alaska Journal

3 December 2018

Riga: On the city’s initiative, the port will take part in a big public conference on the subject “The port of Riga and the city’s inhabitants”

Full article: Port of Riga

28 November 2018

Cruise industry in China: a strategic plan for the period 2018-2030 is unveiled to meet the demands of the 20 million passengers expected by 2030

Full article : Cruise Industry News

28 November 2018

The Port of Honolulu creates a website dedicated to overhauling its master plan and wants to develop a vision for 2050.

Full article: Honolulu Harbor

28 November 2018

Murmansk: €27 million of investment has seen dust particle emissions around the coal terminal cut by three-quarters

Full article: Hellenic Shipping News

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Enterprise-driver Port

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. “

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Cruise ships: What future for onshore power supply in Europe?

The question of onshore power supply for ships was debated specifically at a conference organised by the Cruise Europe association at Le Havre on 24 April 2013.The inclusion of this subject on the conference agenda shows how important it is in today’s cruise ship world, in the face of continued increases in fuel costs and environmental constraints. Also known in French as “courant de quai” and in English as “cold ironing” or “alternative marine power”, this technology seems more and more essential on quays, not only for cruise ships but also for cargo vessels.
The principle is fairly simple and seems to make sense. When the ship is alongside it does not produce power using its on-board generators but plugs into either the onshore power grid or a generator specially supplied by the port, generally powered by LNG or hydrogen. The electricity demand of a cruise ship is considerable, on average three times that of a container carrier. The issue is therefore particularly important for the cruise industry, the more so as ships berth for preference as near as possible to the historic centre of port-cities and calls are becoming ever more numerous, with several large units alongside simultaneously during the season!
The advantages seem obvious for the immediate urban environment and the cruise operators themselves: little or no air pollution, less noise, less overall pollution. However, connection to the local network is a delicate matter because of the amount of power required. There is a risk that consumption peaks may overload the network causing it to cut out! Whether an onshore generator or the local grid is used, the question of supply security must be considered. Abandoning the ship’s energy independence means that operators must have absolute faith in the onshore installations. How can the vessel anticipate power cuts, either for technical reasons or due to union action?
Although some shipping companies, such as Holland America Line, proclaim their confidence in this mode of power supply and are investing in the construction of pre-equipped vessels, particularly for operating on the American west coast, this is not yet the case in Europe. Speakers underlined the difficulties associated with differences in electricity tariffs between European countries. The technology is also already threatened by the introduction of new equipment to enable ships to operate with LNG. This type of fuel has not yet been generally accepted for cruise ships by either the public or industry professionals. There is considerable nervousness about having gas tanks under the passengers’ feet! Whatever happens, the European Commission is inclined to toughen regulations for anti-pollution rules in ports. Onshore power supply, LNG… cruise operators are going to have to adapt. One more reason for a fresh look at the power balance of these vessels. Considerable power savings can still be made, particularly in air-conditioning. It is one of the ways in which cruise ship operators can help with the global environment problem!

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica

31 May 2013

Alotau in Papua-New Guinea preparing to receive cruise ship calls

The Port of Alotau will be restructured by PNG Ports Corporation Limited (PNGPCL) between now and October to enable it to receive the first cruise ships operated by Carnival Australia, one of the biggest operators in the Australian market. This will make it the biggest cruise ship port in the country.
Source: PNG Ports Corporation

31 May 2013

The ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam hope to attract new industry through joint development of their pipeline networks

Source: Ports & Harbors

30 May 2013

War between Europe’s container ports, will the local economy be a collateral victim?

The European economy is in the doldrums, and the profitability of colossal investments in ultra-modern container terminals is retreating. Who will survive the war between the operators? Nobody knows. One can only hope that local economies will not suffer from these highly optimistic strategies.
Source : Journal of Commerce

30 May 2013

Is cruise profitable for the American tax-payer?

Rescue costs for the increasing numbers of incidents involving liners, financial support to companies, and people moving offshore for tax reasons, the USA faces a heavy bill. The adoption of a charter of “Passengers’ Rights” could be the sector’s first response.
Source: Journal de la marine Marchande
Source: Huffingtonpost
Source: Cruise Lines International Association

 

30 May 2013

The absence of intermediate commercial ports and the competition posed by the Panama Canal may limit interest in arctic maritime routes

Source: Le Marin, L’Antenne

28 May 2013

The port of Brest is positioning itself as a logistic and industrial hub for both fixed and floating offshore wind farms

Source : Journal de la Marine Marchande, 17 mai 2013