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Urban Port

19 June 2019

Boston: recommendations for the working port

How can the working port of Boston be preserved and reinvigorated under the continually increasing pressure to give a new use to waterfront sites? Two documents have been produced by Boston Harbour Now, based on discussions with experts and stakeholders, which define recommendations on how to respond to four challenges: growth, synergy, flexibility and change. These recommendations also evolved after the participation of Jill Valdes (Boston Harbour Now) in the AIVP World Conference in Quebec.

Full article : Boston’s Working Port: A Foundation for Innovation ; Boston’s Working Port: Recommendations for the Future

19 June 2019

Paris (France): Point P is working on the integration of its sales points along the banks of the Seine to make them compatible with leisure activities

Full article : Batiweb (+ images)

19 June 2019

Rio Grande (Brazil): the State gives its approval to the port development and zoning plan, which will make port and urban development compatible

Full article : Secretaria de Logistica e Transportes

17 June 2019

The City of Long Beach holds a consultation on its Climate Plan

Since June 2018, around twenty workshops and forums have been organised to present the plan to residents and business leaders. The aim is to prime them for the fight against climate change and rising water levels at the waterfront, and to gauge responses and suggestions. Long Beach joins over a dozen other US cities in adopting a plan of this kind, which includes measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt buildings on the waterfront, etc. The approach is of course in line with goals 1 and 2 from AIVP’s 2030 Agenda.

Full article : Bisnow

17 June 2019

The Port of Marseille opts for the project proposed by LAN architecture for the new waterfront office building

Full article : Made in Marseille

17 June 2019

£1.1 billion in funding announced for Stratford waterfront, with plans for cultural and educational facilities, along with 600 new homes

Full article : 3Dpersonnel ; Mayor of London

12 June 2019

Hanoi: flood risk and urban development

Three options are currently being considered to protect Hanoi from flood risks, while developing over 11,000 hectares of available land on both banks of the Red River. The CRTKL/Arcadis team recommends the third of these options, which involves stabilising the existing banks and creating floodable areas. Various cultural, sports and leisure facilities should complete the urban park. They claim this represents the most resilient option, and offers the most socio-economic benefits.

Full article : Urban Land Magazine

12 June 2019

Brussels: the Region approves the SAU’s plans for the nautical cluster, paving the way for mixed urban and port use of the waterway

Full article : SAU

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Citizen Port

17 June 2019

France’s president announces a plan to increase the number and level of French marine protected areas

Full article: Mer et Marine

17 June 2019

Port authority of Singapore and Our Singapore Reefs sign an agreement for the next three years to disclose and protect the local biodiversity

Full article: Greenport

17 June 2019

CMA-CGM will receive 20 new LNG container vessels until 2022, reducing their environmental footprint

Full article: CMA-CGM

17 June 2019

Port of Tenerife to cut 15 tons of CO2 emissions per year with new plan including smart illumination, electric vehicles and renewable energies

Full article: Portal Portuario, El dia

17 June 2019

Port of Tarragona publishes the report of their port city activities for the year 2018, including numerous examples of animation.

Full article: Port de Tarragona

17 June 2019

Conferences about port governance organized in Chile. Dr. Miguel Angel de Marco gave two masterclasses in the cities of Valparaíso and Asunción, connected to educational and research programmes.

Full article: Portal Portuario

17 June 2019

Photo exhibition in Universitè Littoral in Dunkerque portraits port and maritime activities in the coast of France, Senegal and Togo

Full article: Université du Littoral

12 June 2019

Port of Vigo installs the first artificial micro-reefs to enhance the port’s biodiversity

Full article: Blue Growth Vigo

12 June 2019

Port of Long Beach awards 100 000 $ in scholarships for 77 local high-schools and colleges

Full article: Port of Long Beach

12 June 2019

Port terminal of Talcahuano sings an agreement with high school to facilitate traineeship in the port

Full article: Portal Portuario

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Enterprise-driver Port

17 July 2013

Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Budapest, Vienna and Pisa: reappropriation of the river for logistical use

Since 2011 and the “Connecting with waterways: a capital choice” charter, these port cities have been aiming at CO2-free urban logistics by 2030. Innovations in river transport and respect for the environment should satisfy the needs of the 80% of Europeans who will be city-dwellers in 2050.
Source : Greenport

16 July 2013

Synthesis AIVP Days Helsinki : “Culture and competitiveness of port cities

Announcing the creation of cultural infrastructure in port spaces which are still active, or in the process of conversion, often provokes arguments and disagreements between the players concerned, and also the population.

Are cultural installations essential to the success of the port-city relationship?

Disputes are even more open in a context of local or national economic crisis. This was the case in Iceland in 2008 when the construction of the Harpa Concert Hall at the port-city interface of Reykjavik was launched. Investing so heavily in this type of infrastructure appears risky to many, and at all events not a high priority.

The feedback from the latest AIVP Meeting shows that in the long term this kind of bet on the future does pay. It has a positive impact on the quality of life, turning these sites into attractions which draw thousands of visitors, and places where people want to live. They also strengthen relations and cooperation between the parties involved.

Furthermore, in addition to the specific buildings, the challenge is also to bring new life to a whole territory, and to construct communities. This can be achieved by supporting the creation of “culture districts”, as in Reykjavik or Buenos Aires. Thus particular attention is paid to the quality of public spaces to favour the adoption of the new infrastructure by the population. The Spanish example of Malaga is enlightening in this respect, with the creation of a circuit round the cultural infrastructure which already existed in the city centre and the new infrastructure created on the waterfront. New links are forged, a new port-city weft is created. Appropriation by the population becomes possible thanks to the creation of a single port-city public space and a common imaginary.

At Veracruz, in Mexico, the need for a port extension must also be based on maritime culture, a culture of the sea. This enables the citizen to understand that port growth is not only an economic asset, but also contributes to the social and cultural development of the community.

Supporting the creation of a port culture or supporting the acceptance of port-city development or redevelopment projects – in the end the challenge of cultural infrastructure is the same for the decision-makers, whether for the city or the port.

 

Enhancing the port-city image: the port as an inspiration for architects

In a sense, the competition launched by the port of Piraeus in Greece for the reconversion of the silos into a museum is also a longer term strategic investment. Its aim is to achieve social acceptance of the presence of the port and an improvement in its relations with the city, to change the image of a port which is perceived as a barrier.

The benefits expected from the installation of high quality cultural infrastructure and public spaces here are of course associated with the fact that the passenger port is just next door, and that cruise activity is growing rapidly. The architects decided to open the building to the outside and provide views over the active port. References to the industrial past are also used in the treatment of public spaces to assert the identity of the site.

Taking inspiration from port architecture and exploiting it while respecting the logic of the site is the principle followed also in Marseilles for the various ambitious works of cultural infrastructure which have been carried out along the port-city interface. These projects have been conceived specifically as a function of the unique spirit of the location. Here port architecture becomes a tool by which identity asserts itself against the risk of standardisation. In the case of Marseilles, it is also a question of strengthening its strategic positioning on the international scene.

According to Marta Moretti, the emergence of this problem of identity, of the use of port vocabulary and memories of the city’s port history as opportunities for the creation of a new identity, is characteristic of the second generation of waterfront projects. The economic crisis appears to have brought about a change of attitude, insisting more on the re-use and exploitation of abandoned urban infrastructure. This change is a particular feature of the waterfront redevelopment operations of Northern Europe. Here, the opportunity is taken to re-think the waterfront while paying more attention to the question of sustainability and the importance of public spaces.

 

Citizens, partners in port performance

Port performance now is additionally measured by the degree of knowledge that a territory has of its own industrial and economic tissue. This is especially true in the case of a port-city, which often suffers from the negative and sometimes false image which its own citizens have. How then can a society be constructed which is able to contribute to economic development on the basis of its own identity?

For Hakan Fagerström (Tallink Ferry Company), the emergence of a port culture may have a positive influence on the local economic tissue of the port, but only so long as it is adopted by all the players of the port-city. The need, for economic reasons, to remain in the heart of Helsinki is particularly important for passenger transport companies, whose customers do not like to arrive in a no-man’s-land.

And it is just as important for the city to safeguard activities compatible with urban uses and to offer a berth to ships which demonstrate international trade over the port. According to Pascal Freneau of the Port of Nantes in France, ports are among the elements which structure the world, and comprehension of how trade functions is to be encouraged.

Likewise the Israeli port of Ashdod, since the port was modernised in 2005, has decided to redefine its business strategy and basic values by trying to improve its image and its relationship with the public. This step is born of the conviction that collaboration with the community and its principal institutions is an essential value for a port authority sometimes faced with a difficult social dialogue.

The creation of a Port Centre is one of the measures adopted to give back a certain pride to port workers, and in turn to show the population and the community of Ashdod the different activities and careers offered by the port. It is also a meeting point allowing the port to open its doors and show potential investors the interest shown in the territory by the various communities, institutions and companies. Its attractiveness is strengthened by a local dynamic which invests in the development of a shared port culture.

 

ISPS code, restricted spaces: how to create and manage cultural events in the port environment

For Jean-François Driant, Director of a major cultural infrastructure at Le Havre in France, “There is nothing that looks so like a scene in a theatre as a port basin.” The port is a tremendous vehicle for an imaginary. The only difficulty is to find a common space in which to translate this imaginary while respecting the constraints of artistic creation and the needs of port operations.

The debate underlined the fact that the ISPS Code seems particularly difficult for port authorities to get round, as was shown by the example of Guadeloupe, subjected to pressure and control by the neighbouring United States. As Harald Jaeger, CEO of the port of Valparaiso in Chile remarked, security is an asset for a port, a value to be protected. It would take many years to recover lost cruise ship passengers after an attack. For all that, the 15 years’ experience of Valparaiso, with many initiatives in the cultural, sporting, recreational, etc. fields, show that temporary partial opening of the port (10 days per year) is possible. Contributions from the floor: according to the President of the port of Bahia Blanca in Argentina, one idea is to create specific corridors inside the port, which could be financed by incorporating the cost into port dues. At Malaga, after three years of discussion, access to the wharves when there are no cruise ships in port may be possible in future.

Flexibility seems to be the key word, including being open to events generating up to a million visitors, like the Tall Ships Races. An event which, apart from the immediate benefits for the city, had a double positive impact: strengthening cooperation between city and port players, and generating financing which can subsequently be re-injected into port-city redevelopment projects.

Constructing continuity between city and port, creating an identity and reinforcing culture and the local community, in the long run is a formidable lever for economic and social development which can irrigate an entire territory.

 

AIVP Days Helsinki June 2013 : Presentations available here

Photos Gallery

16 July 2013

15,000 bottles of French wine shipped by sail to one of the best restaurants in the world in Denmark

Source : le Marin

16 July 2013

Calais / Boulogne sur Mer: 2 companies and 5 partners to manage and coordinate the destinies of the two ports.

Source : Le Marin

16 July 2013

Southern Chinese ports suffer as the costs of salaries rise, exports decline and priority is given to the domestic market.

Source : Journal of Commerce

16 July 2013

Port governance: Local partners come together as part of a joint association to manage the development of Brest port.

Source : Le Marin

11 July 2013

China condemns some of the port projects in progress in the country for environmental reasons.

Source : Sino Ship News

9 July 2013

The EU hopes to re-launch intra-European maritime transport: fewer customs formalities to save time and money

Source : European Union

9 July 2013

How can humanity meet the challenge of a sustainable economic model?

lanouvelle controverse_bd_9juillet3In his new book “The New Controversy”, Yannick Roudaut, who spoke at the end of the AIVP 2012 World Conference, questions the worlds of finance, ecology, history and philosophy and brings us their answers. The picture makes no concessions but the view remains optimistic: the challenge can be met.
La nouvelle controverse – Edition La Mer Salée