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Urban Port

20 November 2019

Can efforts to protect against rising sea levels be profitable?

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Developing the city on land reclaimed from the sea in anticipation of rising sea levels could be an opportunity to acquire new urban spaces and facilities. Several such projects have been launched, in Copenhagen, New York, Singapore, and Jakarta. This solution to the climate risk could even generate substantial profits from the sale of the new land and the facilities developed on it, unlike more traditional methods such as building protective embankments. But there is still debate, not just on this point, but also on the need to avoid compromising the quality of facilities made available to the public.

The Guardian

20 November 2019

San Francisco (USA): a park that remembers its port history

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Crane Cove Park is part of the redevelopment plan intended to convert the former naval yards at Pier 70 for urban uses. Designed by Aecom, the new park deliberately retains vestiges of the site’s industrial past, including two port cranes and a launch ramp, while the materials and colour schemes employed will also reference the port. The park will be part of the “Blue greenway”, a network of parks and public spaces reconnecting the city with the waterfront. The ramp formerly used to launch ships will be preserved, and will act as a flood defence.

Attractions Management (+ images)

 

20 November 2019

In Brest (France), the new promenade between the city and port and its viewing tower offer new views of the roadstead and port activities

Actu.fr

20 November 2019

In cooperation with local residents, the Port of Riga (Latvia) is developing sports fields and recreational areas

Freeport of Riga

20 November 2019

To encourage residents and artists to come together in the waterfront district, Port Angeles (WA, United States) is creating a culture and congress centre

Danceland

12 November 2019

Shanghai waterfront: urban ecology and heritage

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A 2.7 kilometer stretch of public space has been developed along the Huangpu. The environment is a key priority for the project, which involves adopting low-carbon technology, re-using some of the existing vegetation, and deploying “spongy city” technologies to anticipate flood risks, etc. The area will house sports and leisure activities, along with urban art, and is taking advantage of the existing industrial heritage.

Shanghai Daily

 

7 November 2019

Tallinn (Estonia): urban developments around a passenger terminal

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The City has planned housing, commercial spaces and a promenade in the area around terminal A. A third cruise dock is also under consideration. The 66.1 hectare site is located in a listed heritage zone to the north of the Old Port. The plan also refers to the 2030 masterplan for the Old Port designed by Zaha Hadid. This strategy of integrating urban and port activities will help make the city a more attractive destination.

NewERR 1News ERR 2

7 November 2019

The Kenyan President has officially opened the Mama Ngina Waterfront Park, developed on more than 10 hectares of land along the Kilindini Canal in Mombasa

Daily nation

7 November 2019

The City and Port of Nanaimo (Canada) set up a committee to plan the waterfront development together

Times Colonist

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Citizen Port

21 November 2019

Outstanding environmental reports of the Port of San Diego (USA) earn recognition with two awards.

Port of San Diego

21 November 2019

New project to improve the quality of the air in Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Port and city will cooperate with two private companies to provide crane vessels with clean energy.

Green Port ; Port of Rotterdam

20 November 2019

Shore side electricity in Le Havre (France), 2 options considered: electric supply from the urban network for cruise ships, and independent production units on other terminals

L’Antenne

20 November 2019

Protection of the Great Barrier Reef a key issue in the new port Masterplans in Queensland (Australia)

Infrastructure magazine

18 November 2019

Cruise are more than ever a crucial topic for the Port-City relationship

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The creation of a discussion group led by Venice Port Authority is an example but other forms of debate happen. In Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain), the 3rd edition of the “Welcome Cruceros!” meeting will take place, bringing together port, city and region to discuss the benefits of this activity. In Talcahuano (Chile), the cruise board of the BioBío Region organized a workshop gathering all relevant stakeholders, including the port authority, municipality and companies. One of the main topics was generating unforgettable experiences for the passenger and using cruises to bring port and city closer together. Finally, the Cruise Dialogue conference will take place next February in Cartagena de Indias (Colombia). Academics, industry and political leaders will discuss the balance between cruises expansion and port-city sustainable relationship. AIVP supports this event and will organize a round table.

La Vanguardia ; Cruise Dialogue 2030

14 November 2019

The port of Barcelona (Spain) advocates for sustainable mobility promoting LNG as alternative fuel, new electric vehicle fleet or electrifying quays for onshore power supply.

El canal marítimo y logístico

13 November 2019

The Port Center of Algeciras (Spain) will be located in a multifonctional building at the City Port interface

Ya Noticias

12 November 2019

North European ports committed to reduce air pollution and noise of docked vessels.

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In the past few days we have seen several initiatives following a similar trend: providing on-shore power to docked vessels to reduce emissions, mostly CO2, nitrogen and sulphur oxides, and noise, affecting the health of local citizens.
In Germany, the federal minister and coastal states have signed a memorandum including different measures to make shore-based power commercially viable. Among the measures are reducing levies and a program of subsidies to improve the port infrastructure. At the same time, the port of Tallinn, in Estonia, has announced that it will install shore power facilities to reduce the emissions and noise of docked vessels. The equipment will be ready by the end of the year, with further expansion in 2020. The port expects to save 120 tonnes of CO2 per ship per month. The Copenhagen Malmo Port has signed an agreement with ferry operator DFDS to establish a shore power facility in Copenhagen, to become operational in 2020.
A recent study from the European Environment Agency’s (EEA) shows that in 2016 air pollution caused over 400 000 premature deaths. The measure of these port cities are positive examples of the actions that can be taken to comply the AIVP Agenda 2030, “Improving living conditions for residents of port cities and protecting their health”.

EEA ; Port of Hamburg ; Port of Tallinn ; Copenhagen Malmö Port ; El Vigia ; Port of Stockholm

30 October 2019

The Ocean Cleanup organization launched “the Interceptor”, an autonomous boat to tackle plastic pollution in rivers. Two prototypes are already working in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Klang (Malaysia)

The barge uses a floating barrier that guides the litter to a conveyor belt extracting the garbage from the water. The debris is distributed into six internal dumpsters with capacity up to 50 m3. When the barge is full, the local operators recibe a signal to collect it and take the garbage to a waste management facility. The barge includes several solar panels, making the system also energy neutral. This kind of solutions can considerably improve the water quality in many port cities, contributing to goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030.

Full article: The Ocean Cleanup

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Enterprise-driver Port

4 June 2013

The re-launch of French ports must be based on three pillars: logistics, industry and the importance of ports for development

Source : French Government (pdf)

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. ”

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Cruise ships: What future for onshore power supply in Europe?

The question of onshore power supply for ships was debated specifically at a conference organised by the Cruise Europe association at Le Havre on 24 April 2013.The inclusion of this subject on the conference agenda shows how important it is in today’s cruise ship world, in the face of continued increases in fuel costs and environmental constraints. Also known in French as “courant de quai” and in English as “cold ironing” or “alternative marine power”, this technology seems more and more essential on quays, not only for cruise ships but also for cargo vessels.
The principle is fairly simple and seems to make sense. When the ship is alongside it does not produce power using its on-board generators but plugs into either the onshore power grid or a generator specially supplied by the port, generally powered by LNG or hydrogen. The electricity demand of a cruise ship is considerable, on average three times that of a container carrier. The issue is therefore particularly important for the cruise industry, the more so as ships berth for preference as near as possible to the historic centre of port-cities and calls are becoming ever more numerous, with several large units alongside simultaneously during the season!
The advantages seem obvious for the immediate urban environment and the cruise operators themselves: little or no air pollution, less noise, less overall pollution. However, connection to the local network is a delicate matter because of the amount of power required. There is a risk that consumption peaks may overload the network causing it to cut out! Whether an onshore generator or the local grid is used, the question of supply security must be considered. Abandoning the ship’s energy independence means that operators must have absolute faith in the onshore installations. How can the vessel anticipate power cuts, either for technical reasons or due to union action?
Although some shipping companies, such as Holland America Line, proclaim their confidence in this mode of power supply and are investing in the construction of pre-equipped vessels, particularly for operating on the American west coast, this is not yet the case in Europe. Speakers underlined the difficulties associated with differences in electricity tariffs between European countries. The technology is also already threatened by the introduction of new equipment to enable ships to operate with LNG. This type of fuel has not yet been generally accepted for cruise ships by either the public or industry professionals. There is considerable nervousness about having gas tanks under the passengers’ feet! Whatever happens, the European Commission is inclined to toughen regulations for anti-pollution rules in ports. Onshore power supply, LNG… cruise operators are going to have to adapt. One more reason for a fresh look at the power balance of these vessels. Considerable power savings can still be made, particularly in air-conditioning. It is one of the ways in which cruise ship operators can help with the global environment problem!

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica

31 May 2013

Alotau in Papua-New Guinea preparing to receive cruise ship calls

The Port of Alotau will be restructured by PNG Ports Corporation Limited (PNGPCL) between now and October to enable it to receive the first cruise ships operated by Carnival Australia, one of the biggest operators in the Australian market. This will make it the biggest cruise ship port in the country.
Source: PNG Ports Corporation

31 May 2013

The ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam hope to attract new industry through joint development of their pipeline networks

Source: Ports & Harbors

30 May 2013

War between Europe’s container ports, will the local economy be a collateral victim?

The European economy is in the doldrums, and the profitability of colossal investments in ultra-modern container terminals is retreating. Who will survive the war between the operators? Nobody knows. One can only hope that local economies will not suffer from these highly optimistic strategies.
Source : Journal of Commerce

30 May 2013

Is cruise profitable for the American tax-payer?

Rescue costs for the increasing numbers of incidents involving liners, financial support to companies, and people moving offshore for tax reasons, the USA faces a heavy bill. The adoption of a charter of “Passengers’ Rights” could be the sector’s first response.
Source: Journal de la marine Marchande
Source: Huffingtonpost
Source: Cruise Lines International Association

 

30 May 2013

The absence of intermediate commercial ports and the competition posed by the Panama Canal may limit interest in arctic maritime routes

Source: Le Marin, L’Antenne