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4 November 2019

Shanghai waterfront: urban ecology and heritage

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A 2.7 kilometre stretch of public space has been developed along the Huangpu, taking advantage of the existing industrial heritage. The area will house sports and leisure activities, along with urban art. The environment is a key priority for the project, which involves adopting low-carbon technology, re-using some of the existing vegetation, and deploying “spongy city” technologies to anticipate flood risks, etc.

Shanghai Daily

 

4 November 2019

Bordeaux (France): after Iboat, a former ferry transformed into a cultural venue, the Bassins à Flots docks are set to host floating offices

Full article : Iboat ; LinkedIn

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4 November 2019

Cadiz (Spain): an agreement between the Mayor of Santa Maria and the President of the Port paves the way for an urban development at the mouth of the river

Full article : Andalucia Informacion

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30 October 2019

Hobart (Tasmania): a fifteen-year masterplan for the waterfront

The Hobart waterfront is already Tasmania’s most popular destination. TasPorts, which owns and operates the port, is keen to make the area even more attractive by restructuring part of the docks. Measures including replacing certain ageing buildings, creating a marina in an area currently home to fishing activities, additional berths for cruise vessels, and a new layout for existing berths. Anthony Donald, CEO of TasPorts, has announced that the process will be carried out in consultation with stakeholders.

Full article : ABC news

30 October 2019

Boston: a waterfront hotel designed with a permeable ground floor, to anticipate rising sea levels

Full article : Archinect

30 October 2019

Dunkirk (France): an ice rink designed by Chabanne et Partenaires on a former industrial port site

Full article : Chroniques d’architecture ; Video

28 October 2019

Copenhagen: waste plant and leisure centre

“Copenhill”, a new waste recycling plant, is now open to the public. The site is in fact much more than just a power plant, and is home to various leisure facilities including a ski slope, climbing wall, and hiking trail. It also has an environmental education centre, and commands panoramic views of the city and port. The project was designed by Bjarke Ingels and landscape architects LSA. Full article : Design boom (+ images)

28 October 2019

New York City finally set to create a new park on the Union Dry Dock site in Hoboken

Full article : Hudson reporter

28 October 2019

Morocco’s National Ports Agency considers plans to redevelop the former port of Safi and integrate the site into the city

Full article : Le Matin

23 October 2019

The port of Riga receives an award for its Wind Barriers

The project was marked out for special praise at the annual architectural awards in Riga. The 2 kilometre long, 23 metre high barriers was installed at the new coal terminal built on Krievu Island, and aims to reduce dust pollution in urban areas. Other technological measures have also been taken to improve the level of protection further.

Full article : Freeport of Riga

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Citizen Port

30 October 2019

The Ocean Cleanup organization launched “the Interceptor”, an autonomous boat to tackle plastic pollution in rivers. Two prototypes are already working in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Klang (Malaysia)

The barge uses a floating barrier that guides the litter to a conveyor belt extracting the garbage from the water. The debris is distributed into six internal dumpsters with capacity up to 50 m3. When the barge is full, the local operators recibe a signal to collect it and take the garbage to a waste management facility. The barge includes several solar panels, making the system also energy neutral. This kind of solutions can considerably improve the water quality in many port cities, contributing to goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030.

Full article: The Ocean Cleanup

30 October 2019

The South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) hosted the Forward Thinking for Maritime Education and Training Excellence Conference to discuss the new skills development and entrepreneurial opportunities offered by the blue economy and the 4th industrial revolution. The underlying discussion was the need to speed up the creations of jobs in the ocean economy, to reach the targets of the Operation Phakisa, launched in 2014, to expand the blue economy

Full article: Global Africa

30 October 2019

Natural habitat created by the Port of Tilbury as compensation measure for new distribution park becomes wildlife relevant site for insects and invertebrates

Full article: Forth Ports , Greenport

30 October 2019

The Port of Strasbourg offers new guided tours responding to the success of previous visits during the European Heritage Day. The tours will take place on November 6th

Full article: Batorama

28 October 2019

Port of Seattle joins partners to develop the “Maritime Blue Innovation Accelerator”

Port of Seattle partners up with co-working company WeWork and Washington State cluster Maritime Blue to create Maritime Blue Innovation Accelerator, a new start-up incubator. The main goals are to help maritime companies to innovate, be more sustainable and establish Washington State as a global leader in maritime economy. These programs are crucial to foster human capital development for the future port city economy. There are already similar solutions in Rotterdam, Hamburg or Singapore.

Full article: Port of Seattle, Maritime Blue

28 October 2019

Port of Valencia launches the SuperLabPorts, a platform to support innovative port and maritime start-ups in the field of climate change

Full article: Esmartcity

23 October 2019

Port leaders gather in Barcelona to discuss Smart port technologies in the event “Smart Ports – Piers of the Future” between 19 to 21 of november 2019

The Port of Barcelona, along with other 5 leading ports – including AIVP members Rotterdam, Antwerp and Montreal-, will host during the next Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona, a parallel event titled “Smart Ports – Piers of the Future”. Among the main discussion topics will be digitalisation, automation and connectivity.

Full article: Smart Ports, Program

23 October 2019

Port of Rotterdam Authority joined the ‘Noah’s Train’ initiative to draw attention of the environmental benefits of rail over road transportation. The train includes two containers from each one of the stops specifically designed for the occasion.

Full article: Port Technology, Rail Freight Forward

23 October 2019

Amendments to the BWM Convention to prevent invasive species enter into force this week. The amendment is the implementation of a new schedule for the ballast water D2 Standard, with stricter criteria of presence of organisms and potentially harmful pathogens. Other amendments include survey and certification

Full article: Maritime Professional

21 October 2019

European ports meet in Venice to discuss the future of cruises

Port of Venice hosts the meeting “Cruise 2030: Call for Action”, gathering delegates of several major European cruise ports to discuss the future of the sector and the interaction with cities. The main idea on the table is developing a “Europe Class fleet” compatible with European port cities. This discussions directly reflect goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030, concerning health and life quality of local citizens. The next meeting of the working group will be in Palma de Mallorca, next January


Full article: Port of Venice 

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Enterprise-driver Port

17 May 2013

French ports: visible progress since the reform of 2011

While reliability seems to have been restored, three challenges have emerged for the future: connection with the hinterland, multimodal services, and productivity. In terms of regional dynamics around ports, like that served by the Seine Axis, two have emerged: Rhône artery, Brittany pole or Dunkerque-Lille Axis. Source : Supply Chain Magazine

17 May 2013

Marco Polo Programme: 434 M€ of environmental benefits and 21,900 Mt-km less cargo on European roads

Source : European Union

17 May 2013

Trieste: the search for new projects for Porto Vecchio

While a dispute is ongoing with the PortoCittà, company, the Port President, Marina Monassi, has launched a new call for a project to gather more expressions of interest in re-furbishing the oldest part of the port of Trieste. Source: Il Piccolo

16 May 2013

Partout dans le monde la conscience du consommateur se développe et la chaîne logistique durable devient un atout commercial

Source : The Guardian

15 May 2013

Transform the Suez Canal corridor into a major economic zone and increase its revenue

Source : Al Shorfa

 

22 February 2013

The World Bank – A Partner for City-Port Projects: An Interview with Marc Juhel, Sector Manager for Transport

The World Bank is one of the specialized institutions developed under the auspices of the United Nations (UN). The World Bank is an essential partner for port cities in helping them to implement their projects, but its strategy and work in the development of city-port projects still sometimes go unrecognized. In order to find out more, the AIVP interviewed Marc Juhel at the Bank’s headquarters in Washington.AIVP: The World Bank has on many occasions shown interest in the work of AIVP in improving the city-port dynamic. In what ways does AIVP’s work coincide with the current concerns and the strategic transport and urban development objectives of the World Bank?

M.J: More than half of the world’s population already lives in urban areas, and the great majority of growth envisaged over the 21st century will take place in the cities of poor, developing countries. The urban agenda must, therefore, form a critical focus for any modern sustainable development policy. At the same time, helping these countries to emerge from chronic poverty requires enabling them to emerge with strong growth. This is the only way to generate the necessary economic benefits. This growth will come largely from increased international exchange of goods, foreign trade and access to global markets: the most important aspects of economic development policies. 90% of trade is still carried out by sea, and this is where urban and transport policies come together. Port cities are now not only national platforms for commerce, but often also regional and international ones. The city-port dynamic must, therefore, reconcile the demands of balanced urban development with those of a logistics industry still looking to optimize transport flows in terms of time and expense. This sometimes leads to approaches that conflict with good use of space, and to the need to arbitrate these conflicts in favor of the aims of the city and the country as a whole. The World Bank, when it is able, advises its client countries and their port cities on how to best carry out this arbitration.

AIVP: Has the need for urban integration of ports, both spatial and functional, become an important criterion for the awarding of World Bank loans?

M.J: The Bank is keen to stress the importance of this spatial and functional integration, which sometimes requires the physical separation of urban and port traffic flows, but also often offers the opportunity to bring to light the complementarity of port and urban policies, particularly during port extension operations and the updating of economically obsolete infrastructure. As a result, when the Bank is approached in the context of an urban or port development project in a port city, our teams are careful to ensure that this interface, and the issues it can give rise to, are fully discussed.

AIVP: Which port city operations in receipt World Bank loans are, in your opinion, particularly symbolic in this regard? Why are they notable?

M.J: The Rijeka* project in Croatia is a recent example of a port operation which integrates opportunities both for urban redevelopment and for the enhancement of maritime heritage in coastal urban areas. More ambitious, perhaps, is the Port Cities Development Program Project for the Republic of Yemen which aimed to improve the investment climate whilst encouraging growth and job creation in the three port cities of Aden, Hodeidah and Mukalla. This program, spanning twelve years, started with small-scale investment in infrastructure, followed by the designing of City Development Strategies for each of the three port cities. Later came more specific projects, such as the First and Second Port Cities Development Projects of Yemen, which helped to implement the actions identified in the Development Strategies.

AIVP: The issue of “sustainable” and “livable” cities is on the World Bank’s agenda. In this context, what kind of initiatives do you think can be promoted in the area of city-port cooperation?

M.J: To make cities more economically efficient and more socially inclusive: this is the main aim in terms of development and the fight against poverty. This task should be seen within the larger framework that the World Bank defines as Green Growth for All. Cities in general, and port cities in particular, are important vehicles for economic growth. As ports are such key instruments for international trade, the cities that harbor them therefore find themselves at the forefront of global competition for access to new markets. International financial institutions, when assisting the port cities of their client countries, must ensure that the needs of ports in the international logistics chain are effectively balanced with the needs of cities striving for socially balanced development. This is the approach of the World Bank.

*The port and the city of Rijeka are active members of the AIVP.

15 January 2013

Industrial ecology, the port-city model

Kate RoystonThe presentations and debates on industrial ecology were among the most interesting areas of the 13th AIVP World Conferencein June 2012. The numerous projects in progress throughout the world, in Europe, China and Korea for example, show the level of interest in this new approach to development based on a circular economy which optimises the re-use of resources and promotes a carbon-free environment. At the heart of these new strategies, cooperation and mutualisation have been the key words of the AIVP message since its creation.

Read Kate Royston (MBA AIEMA, Robbee Smole – Sustainable Business Solutions)

9 November 2012

Obama Administration : “We Can’t Wait” Initiative, Five Major Port Projects

Last July 2012, President Obama, the context of his “We can’t Wait” policy initiated in the autumn of 2011, announced the acceleration of the launch procedures for 5 major port projects in the United States, projects concerning the port cities of Jacksonville, Miami, Savannah, New York and Charleston. The objective is a modernisation of the infrastructures with the aim to encourage American economic growth, notably by adapting the ports concerned to the largest size of vessels which will use the new Panama Canal.
This decision has been the subject of numerous reactions and comments as to the true state of the network of the maritime and waterway infrastructures in the USA, and to the financial effort which it would be necessary to engage in order to avoid a loss of competitiveness of the country’s economy, and to its consequences in terms of employment.
The challenge is thus a major one and it has therefore appeared interesting to us to give space to one of our members, in the person of Franc Pigna, Managing Director of Aegir Port Property Advisers, regarding this dossier. Present in the AIVP network since 2004, Franc Pigna was one of the speakers at the closing round table of the 13th World Conference of Cities and Ports. He gives us here his point of view, in a personal opinion.
In the future, if you also, as a member of AIVP, wish to react on the news from port cities and bring your own thoughts to bear on the themes supported by AIVP, please do not hesitate to contact us. This enhancement of our debates is the foundation of our action and will contribute to the vivacity and dynamic of our Association.

Opinion by Franc J Pigna, CRE, FRICS, CMC, Managing Director Aegir Port Property Advisers

12 July 2012

13th World Conference Cities and Ports : Lessons from Saint-Nazaire and Nantes

The 13th World Conference of Cities and Ports organised In Saint-Nazaire and Nantes from 18 to 21 June 2012 assembled 450 participants coming from 46 countries. This new World Conference of AIVP had the ambition to take bearings on the answers brought by the stakeholders of port cities to their problematics of development. The angle of approach of the city-port projects chosen this time by AIVP was that of the place of the port and of its functions in the implementation of the sustainable development strategies of the port cities and regions. Globalisation, the effects of which on cities and ports were more at the centre of the reflections over the last few years, is today perfectly digested by the territories. The participants to this latest AIVP Conference are no longer questioning themselves about globalisation but revealed the emergence of new territorial strategies and of cooperation illustrated by numerous examples: energy transition and reconversion of city and port territories; new cooperation between port activities, industrial sectors, and University and research spheres; “tailor made” governances, in particular associating the citizens…

Through the exchanges of experience organised around the projects developed in the port cities of all continents, the first of the observations to be made is that the question of the city – port connection remains central nearly 25 years after the foundation of AIVP. Over and above the classic strategies of the recuperation of abandoned port spaces for urban purposes for waterfront projects, it is the whole question of city port governance which is posed. The question of the city port integration of “how to build the port with the city” is at the heart of the debates in most port cities. Urban development projects are today much more than projects for the improvement or the reconversion of the city port interfaces, they stem from an overall reflection on the identity and specificities of the contemporary port city where the integration of urban and port functions finds its full place.

This new AIVP conference enabled the measure of the local challenges to be taken. These now go well beyond urban planning strategies to directly tackle more overall notions of economic performance, of the well-being of the citizens and of sustainable development.

In this respect, the creation in numerous port cities of research centres which constitute as many “think tanks” on the problematics of local development is revealing. It testifies to the desire of the stakeholders to place innovation at the centre of the strategic reflections in order to respond to global economic but also social and environmental challenges. Politicians, port managements, and enterprises are clearly mobilising to encourage a new spirit for the port cities and regions.

The energy problematic constitutes without doubt a fairly good illustration of this phenomenon. Faced with the energy and industrial challenge represented by the programmed disappearance of fossil energies, the port cities are mobilising. The existing port infrastructures, the density of networks and the proximity of centres of industrial production and consumption make port cities privileged places for the implementation and experimentation of renewable energies connected with their marine or waterway environment and of systems of industrial ecology connected with the economic tissue. Offshore wind farms, marine current power, thermal energy of the sea or wave mechanics, even the production of hydrogen on offshore platforms are so many paths being explored or which are already the subject of industrial wagers. In thus becoming a producer of energy, the port adds to its classic functions at the service of the transport of goods a new sector and a new challenge. It also obtains a new image vis-à-vis the community and the populations.

Still in the context of this research for a new spirit for the port cities and regions, the debate is today opening around questions of multimodality and new territorial strategies. Initiatives having recourse to the waterway in order to assure proximity logistics in the big cities are multiplying and becoming economically viable as well as desirable from the environmental and urban development point of view. Through the port and its functions, the connection is thus made better between the port city and the metropolitan region.

After the time of coexistence of the first years of AIVP, then of cohabitation organised between city and port, and even beyond the sectorial cooperations which are developing today, the time is henceforth appearing for the implementation of closer partnerships, or even to the mutualisation of resources and territories; a mutualisation on the local scale between city, port and their partners but also on a regional scale.

In a context of global economic and environmental crisis the field of competition is being displaced. The port cities of a same geopolitical and economic territory are now allying to become more coherent and more competitive ensembles in the face of other regions of the world. This 13th AIVP Conference has shown that regional, national and even transnational “gateways” and “clusters” are multiplying. It is now a question of promoting, around the port functions, a regional territorial development associating several cities and several ports and capable of integrating and handling simultaneously, granting them the same degree of importance, social, economic and environmental problematics.

We have perhaps there the strongest message given by the Loire Estuary to the delegates participating in the works of AIVP: the answer to global challenges now supposes having the capacity and the intelligence to make the port cities evolve from competition to cooperation!

www.citiesandports2012.com