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Floatting poultry Rotterdam
29 July 2020

A new floating chicken farm on a basin in Rotterdam

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Goldsmith architecture will create a floating chicken farm in Rotterdam. It follows the rules of the circular economy: on the top floor, 7000 hens live under a translucent roof giving them permanent daylight; on the middle floor are operated eggs packaging and waste management; on the lowest floor (under water) is a LED-powered cress farm, using manure as fertilizer. In addition, solar panels provide 100% of the farm’s energy needs.
As the growing lack of space within the city is a tangible obstacle for developing local food production, floating structures can be a part of the solution.

DesignBoom

 

29 July 2020

The port of Le Havre will test a new bicycle lane in the framework of the VéloMaritime European project, comprising more than 1500 km of bicycle roads from Belgium until Brittany in France.

HAROPA – Port of Le Havre, VéloMaritime

28 July 2020

The Port of Seville (Spain) could relocate its cruise terminal

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Moving cruise activity to a new location would free up space for a marina capable of accommodating yachts and mega-yachts close to the city centre. Originally, the Port had targeted flexibility with a cruise terminal made from recycled containers, a non-permanent solution that ensured the spaces could be re-used for new purposes, as recommended by our Guide of Good Practices. The move represents the start of a new phase for the Las Delicias precinct, which will further enhance the appeal of this port city.

Diario de Sevilla

28 July 2020

Arona (Tenerife, Canary Islands): the City Port committee meets to find ways of improving mobility and easing congestion on port access roads

El Dia

27 July 2020

A project inspired by the area’s industrial and maritime past for the Greenwich peninsula (UK)

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“Morden Wharf” has been designed by OMA architects. It will include 12 apartment blocks, shops, and public spaces, and is heavily inspired by the warehouses, silos and gas holders that once stood on the Greenwich peninsula. There are also plans for a park with views across the Thames to the famous Canary Wharf.

Design boom (+ images)

27 July 2020

Freeport (Bahamas): the government and Royal Caribbean Cruises strike an agreement on the new cruise terminal, to include a hotel and theme park

Full article : The Nassau Guardian

22 July 2020

City and Port of Saint John (Canada) work together to increase the docking area in uptown. The new dredging and docks will allow more recreational boats to reach Market Slip.

Saint John

20 July 2020

What does the future hold for the Hong Kong waterfront?

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It has finally been decided that a two-stage tender process will be launched for one of the central areas of the Hong Kong waterfront, located between the business district and the Star Ferry Piers. The move is a response to criticism and earlier suggestions highlighting the need for a global approach, with an emphasis on developing public spaces and connections between these different parts of the city.

Urban Land (2018) ; Urban Land (2020)

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Citizen Port

29 July 2020

Technological challenge proposed by the Port of Algeciras (Spain) wins the “Fiware Zone” contest, hosted by the region and telecommunication company. The challenge will focus on innovative technology for environmental impact data.

El Estrecho Digital

29 July 2020

City and Port work together in Livorno (Italy) to clean the “New Venice” district canals

Livorno Port Center

29 July 2020

New initiative for community dialogue in Bahía Blanca

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The Port of Bahía Blanca (Argentina) has started the new online participative forums “Puerto Abierto” to establish new dialogues with the local community. The first meeting included representatives from the agricultural and food sector. The goal of the forums is to debate and align the expectations and needs from the local community with the actions of the port authority. The dialogue will be structured in three phases: diagnosis, discussion of ideas and starting the agreed projects. The participants of the future debate sessions will include representatives from the academy and scientific sector, business organizations, workers, environmental, and cultural initiatives. The final result will be a new strategic plan built from the social agreements.

Port of Bahía Blanca

29 July 2020

Protecting biodiversity: Education and positive environmental effects

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Port cities host a rich biodiversity. Protecting it can bring associated positive effects, besides the obvious ones. In Tarragona (Spain), the green areas policy of the port authority is showing excellent results. These areas must reduce the water footprint, promote the biodiversity and mitigate the CO2 emissions. The port has focused on the reforestation of degraded spaces and replacing water intensive plants for others more adapted to the Mediterranean climate. Every year, these areas neutralize 1500 tons of CO2 and provide shelter for endangered species such as bees. In Ceuta (Spain), the Port Authority supports the local Sea Museum (Museo del Mar), that is responsible for studying, protecting and disclosing the local biodiversity. This institution publishes several books and magazines promoting the results of their research, for example on the impact of ships on whales and dolphins. The museum also organizes educational activities and leads projects to include coastal areas in the European networks of protected natural reserves. Additionally, it is responsible for a unique facility, the “pudridero” a facility to preserve the carcasses and collect the bones to study and learn about marine animals.

El Vigía, Museo del Mar Ceuta

29 July 2020

Port Cities supporting the food production sector

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The crucial role of port cities in food logistics is well known, but they can also be relevant in the production, particularly of seafood as one project from Valencia (Spain) shows us this week. The salinity, nutrients and location of nurseries in port waters are excellent for the production of clòtxina valenciana (Mediterranean Mussel). In the case of Valencia, the yearly production reaches 1200 tons. The quality of the water is guaranteed by the port authority and the mussels are controlled by the regional authorities to guarantee that they are safe for consumption.

Europa Press

27 July 2020

South American Port Cities continue fighting the Covid-19

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With the threat of the second wave of contagions grows in many countries, in South America, port city actors continue their solidarity actions to reduce the effects of the Covid19. The port of Valparaiso (Chile) continues to support the local community, with donations of equipment to the local hospital and food to disadvantaged collectives. In the meantime, in San Antonio (Chile), the port community lead by the port authority has sponsored a new laboratory to obtain faster test results. In Buenos Aires (Argentina), the port authority has extended the subsidies to concessionaries to reduce the economic impact of the crisis.

Nex News – El Mercurio de Valpraíso, Nex News – El Líder de San Antonio, Portal Portuario

22 July 2020

Port and City work together in Ceuta to improve the air quality.

Ceuta Actualidad

22 July 2020

The Talcahuano (Chile) Logistic Community (Comlog) will deploy an agenda oriented towards community relations and sustainability.

Portal Portuario

22 July 2020

Referendum in Key West (USA) to decide the future of cruises

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The citizen non-profit organization “Key West Committee for Safer Cleaner Ships” has successfully gathered enough signature to call for a referendum in November’s ballot. The referendum will include three questions:

1 – limit the number of pax disembarking to 1,500/day;

2 – ban ships with more than 1,300 pax;

3 – prioritize cruise lines with the best environmental and health records.

This initiative arrives in a critical moment, when the industry is debating when the activity should restart. At the same time that some companies announce national or regional cruises, for example in Italy or Germany, the control institutions of some countries such as the USA, extend the “No Sail Order” for all cruise ships. AIVP hosted a webinar dedicated to cruises last June, and will retake the debate after the summer period, framed under goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030, considering the health and life quality of port city citizens.

Safer Cleaner Ships, Maritime-Executive, Cruise Critic, USA Today, CDC USA, AIVP Webinar, Agenda AIVP 2030

22 July 2020

More Port Cities are focusing on Biodiversity protection

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Two excellent projects focused on preserving or restoring the natural biodiversity: In Rouen (France), the Port Authority HAROPA, has developed between 2017 and 2019 a project to restore the wetlands connected to the Seine river in Sahurs. The new structure and water canal allow the tide to reenter the area and recover the natural environment of the estuary. In 2020 the port authority planted flora improving the integration of the site in the landscape and installed educational panels. In Bahía Blanca (Argentina), the Marine Wildlife Rescue Station has helped more 115 animals from 15 different species, over the past two years, since it was created. This facility is the result of the cooperation of the port authority of Bahía Blanca with several environmental organizations.

HAROPA – Port of Rouen, Port of Bahía Blanca

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Enterprise-driver Port

5 June 2013

World Bank: Kenya must solve the problem of port congestion in Mombasa. Land-locked countries are calling for another outlet to the sea.

Source : Standard Media

4 June 2013

Port of Los Angeles: energy management will give a competitive edge in the future

On 3 June 2013, the port launched its energy action plan. Reliability of supply, optimisation of consumption, lowering costs, reducing environmental impact, etc. – the object is to increase the port’s independence from the regional electricity industry and guarantee service quality under all circumstances. (photo © aivp)
Source : Port of Los Angeles

4 June 2013

Maputo and Transnet reach an agreement on reciprocal use of their facilities to help the rapid economic expansion of southern Africa

Source : www.iol.co.za

4 June 2013

Trade diversity, wind generation industries, the environment – the Port of Nantes Saint Nazaire is trumpeting its ambitions

Source : Le Marin

4 June 2013

The re-launch of French ports must be based on three pillars: logistics, industry and the importance of ports for development

Source : French Government (pdf)

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. ”

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Cruise ships: What future for onshore power supply in Europe?

The question of onshore power supply for ships was debated specifically at a conference organised by the Cruise Europe association at Le Havre on 24 April 2013.The inclusion of this subject on the conference agenda shows how important it is in today’s cruise ship world, in the face of continued increases in fuel costs and environmental constraints. Also known in French as “courant de quai” and in English as “cold ironing” or “alternative marine power”, this technology seems more and more essential on quays, not only for cruise ships but also for cargo vessels.
The principle is fairly simple and seems to make sense. When the ship is alongside it does not produce power using its on-board generators but plugs into either the onshore power grid or a generator specially supplied by the port, generally powered by LNG or hydrogen. The electricity demand of a cruise ship is considerable, on average three times that of a container carrier. The issue is therefore particularly important for the cruise industry, the more so as ships berth for preference as near as possible to the historic centre of port-cities and calls are becoming ever more numerous, with several large units alongside simultaneously during the season!
The advantages seem obvious for the immediate urban environment and the cruise operators themselves: little or no air pollution, less noise, less overall pollution. However, connection to the local network is a delicate matter because of the amount of power required. There is a risk that consumption peaks may overload the network causing it to cut out! Whether an onshore generator or the local grid is used, the question of supply security must be considered. Abandoning the ship’s energy independence means that operators must have absolute faith in the onshore installations. How can the vessel anticipate power cuts, either for technical reasons or due to union action?
Although some shipping companies, such as Holland America Line, proclaim their confidence in this mode of power supply and are investing in the construction of pre-equipped vessels, particularly for operating on the American west coast, this is not yet the case in Europe. Speakers underlined the difficulties associated with differences in electricity tariffs between European countries. The technology is also already threatened by the introduction of new equipment to enable ships to operate with LNG. This type of fuel has not yet been generally accepted for cruise ships by either the public or industry professionals. There is considerable nervousness about having gas tanks under the passengers’ feet! Whatever happens, the European Commission is inclined to toughen regulations for anti-pollution rules in ports. Onshore power supply, LNG… cruise operators are going to have to adapt. One more reason for a fresh look at the power balance of these vessels. Considerable power savings can still be made, particularly in air-conditioning. It is one of the ways in which cruise ship operators can help with the global environment problem!

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica