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Urban Port

8 July 2020

New passenger terminal in Valencia (Spain) will integrate historic shipyard’s building and be environmentally friendly

Port of Valencia

6 July 2020

The City of Rotterdam aiming to buff its green credentials

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Plans to invest €233 have been announced for seven projects in various districts of the city. The aim is to make the city not just greener, but also more resilient to major outbreaks like the Covid-19 pandemic. Districts covered by the plan include the former port sectors of Rijnhaven and Masshaven.

Dutch review

6 July 2020

The port of Cartagena (Spain) launched an invitation to tender for new uses and improvements to the integration of its waterfront

Diario el Canal ; La verdad

6 July 2020

The Port and City of Los Angeles (USA) trade land and demolish an oil tank, as part of plans to develop a new promenade by 2022

Sea News ; Daily Breeze

1 July 2020

The Port of Auckland (New Zealand) create a vertical garden

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The aim is to integrate its car-handling terminal building more effectively into the urban surroundings. It will form a local landmark for the City Port and its roof will be turned into a public park within a few years. It will also promote biodiversity. The garden meets sustainability criteria, and everything in it can be either re-used or recycled.

Hanging Gardens ; Video

29 June 2020

The former submarine base in Marseilles (France) is set to accommodate a data center and will become a cornerstone of the Smart Port

20 minutes ; Video

29 June 2020

The Port of Malaga (Spain) aims to reposition in the sailing market by targeting mega-yachts and planning to create marina with 600 to 650 berths

Malaga Hoy

22 June 2020

5.4 million euros for the Le Havre Smart Port City project

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The subsidy from the French State will pave the way for the project to move forward into the operational phase. The project brings together local communities, the port, private stakeholders, educational and research institutes. It aims to transform the local area over the next ten years, using innovative solutions in the fields of mobility, energy, smart data, the ecological transition, relations with the public, education and training, and general attractiveness.

Le Havre Smart Port City (+ video) ; Actualités

22 June 2020

The Port of San Diego (USA) invites contractors to tender bids as part of a plan to create urban art in two waterfront parks. Deadline: 11 July

sdnews ; Port of San Diego

22 June 2020

The City and Port of Palma (Spain) reach agreement on plans for a promenade to bridge the City-Port divide and reconnect the two areas

El Vigia

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Citizen Port

8 July 2020

New Port Center in Dunkirk

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Last Saturday, 4th of July, the Port Center of Dunkirk (France) opened its doors to public for the 1st time. The process started 2 years ago, with the support of the main partners, the Urban Community of Dunkirk, the Port Authority, ACMAPOR association (Association for the creation of a home for port life and traditions) and the Port Museum. The new Port Center is located in the Port Museum and its exhibition is based on 7 topics: the identity the port, ships, goods, men, territory, prospects and opening to the world. The new space with 240 sqm. will be main point for the port-city-citizen relationship.

Dunkerque Port Center

8 July 2020

Port of Dakar (Senegal) extends its support to local hospitals, donating 10 mechanical ventilators.

Port of Dakar

8 July 2020

Beauport Bay in Quebec (Canada) will be the object of significant investment to mitigate the effects of the Laurentia project. The interventions have been agreed in a collaborative effort with local organizations

➜ Port of Quebec

8 July 2020

Protecting Biodiversity in Port Cities: Working with nature in Sevilla

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The port of Sevilla (Spain) presents an innovative project combining the management of dredging sediments and the creation of new habitats for threatened aquatic birds. This project follows the new work philosophy of “working with nature” and is a collaboration with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). More ports around world are making new efforts for biodiversity. The port of Singapore has commissioned a coral relocation and conservation program, and in Imbituba (Brazil), the port launched the 12º edition of the whale monitoring program as part of their environmental plan.

Port of Sevilla (PDF), Rice Media, Portos e Navios

8 July 2020

Port Cities and Universities working together

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Human Capital development is goal 5 of the AIVP Agenda 2030, and a priority for many members. The port of Venice will allocate €600k for the Ca’ Foscari University to create a study center focused on maritime and logistic activities. Part of the funding will also be dedicated to the new “Venice Science Gallery”. In Bahía Blanca, Argentina, the port has signed new agreements with the National Technological University (Bahía Blanca Regional Faculty), with whom we have already been working together, to develop new educational programs. In Algeciras, Spain, the city, the port and the university are working together for the creation of the European Sea University, in the Lago Marítimo project.

Nuova Venezia, Facebook (Bahía Blanca), El Estrecho Digital

1 July 2020

The Port of Auckland (New Zealand) create a vertical garden

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The aim is to integrate its car-handling terminal building more effectively into the urban surroundings. It will form a local landmark for the City Port and its roof will be turned into a public park within a few years. It will also promote biodiversity. The garden meets sustainability criteria, and everything in it can be either re-used or recycled.

Hanging Gardens ; Video

1 July 2020

New EU project to reduce the air and acoustic pollution in cities. The port of Valencia will host one of the pilot projects.

Esmarcity

1 July 2020

Archive of the port of Lisbon joins the celebration of the City of Archives of Barreiro, with special visits and exhibitions.

Barreiro municipality

1 July 2020

Is hydrogen the best solution for the energy transition in Port Cities?

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Reducing the emissions and the environmental footprint is one of the main challenges for port cities. Even though in some cases, urban traffic might be the main pollution source, as the Port of Valencia (Spain) shows in a recent study, ports still play a crucial role. Although there is no silver bullet, a combination of existing solutions and new fuels like hydrogen is showing promising results. For example, in Lisbon (Portugal), the city announced a pilot project of a green hydrogen production station for vehicles, while the port will electrify its quays starting in 2022, reducing cruises pollution. In Valencia, the port will have a hydrogen refuelling station already in 2021, framed in the H2PORTS EU project. Other key green energy projects in Spain are going to take place in the port of Bilbao, where industry leader Repsol will invest €80 million. One project will be one of the largest net zero emissions synthetic fuel production plants, based on green hydrogen, while the other will be gas production plant from urban waste. The importance of hydrogen is visible in the national strategies of some countries, like Germany.

Port of Valencia, Eco Sapo (Lisbon), Europa Press, H2-view, El Mercantil, NPI Magazine

1 July 2020

Efforts of AIVP members recognized in the WPSP awards

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The winners of the 6 awards of the World Port Sustainability Program (WPSP) were announced on June 24th. This program, of which AIVP is one of the founding partners, recognizes the efforts of ports around the globe to contribute to the sustainable development agenda. In this edition, organized in 6 categories, AIVP members earned well deserved recognitions. The ports of Valencia and Venice are part of the winning entry for resilient infrastructure, the collaborative project “Green and Connected (Green C) Ports”. The ports of Rotterdam, Amsterdam and North Sea Port earned via the Dutch Seaports organization the award for governance and ethics. Other members also were among the finalists in several categories, such as the ports of Marseille, Rotterdam (in a second category), Helsinki or Montreal.

WPSP – Sustainable World Ports

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Enterprise-driver Port

20 May 2013

New container vessels become problem for ports! The city has to be able to keep up, including intermodal capacity

Source: www.portarea.com

17 May 2013

French ports: visible progress since the reform of 2011

While reliability seems to have been restored, three challenges have emerged for the future: connection with the hinterland, multimodal services, and productivity. In terms of regional dynamics around ports, like that served by the Seine Axis, two have emerged: Rhône artery, Brittany pole or Dunkerque-Lille Axis. Source : Supply Chain Magazine

17 May 2013

Marco Polo Programme: 434 M€ of environmental benefits and 21,900 Mt-km less cargo on European roads

Source : European Union

17 May 2013

Trieste: the search for new projects for Porto Vecchio

While a dispute is ongoing with the PortoCittà, company, the Port President, Marina Monassi, has launched a new call for a project to gather more expressions of interest in re-furbishing the oldest part of the port of Trieste. Source: Il Piccolo

16 May 2013

Partout dans le monde la conscience du consommateur se développe et la chaîne logistique durable devient un atout commercial

Source : The Guardian

15 May 2013

Transform the Suez Canal corridor into a major economic zone and increase its revenue

Source : Al Shorfa

 

22 February 2013

The World Bank – A Partner for City-Port Projects: An Interview with Marc Juhel, Sector Manager for Transport

The World Bank is one of the specialized institutions developed under the auspices of the United Nations (UN). The World Bank is an essential partner for port cities in helping them to implement their projects, but its strategy and work in the development of city-port projects still sometimes go unrecognized. In order to find out more, the AIVP interviewed Marc Juhel at the Bank’s headquarters in Washington.AIVP: The World Bank has on many occasions shown interest in the work of AIVP in improving the city-port dynamic. In what ways does AIVP’s work coincide with the current concerns and the strategic transport and urban development objectives of the World Bank?

M.J: More than half of the world’s population already lives in urban areas, and the great majority of growth envisaged over the 21st century will take place in the cities of poor, developing countries. The urban agenda must, therefore, form a critical focus for any modern sustainable development policy. At the same time, helping these countries to emerge from chronic poverty requires enabling them to emerge with strong growth. This is the only way to generate the necessary economic benefits. This growth will come largely from increased international exchange of goods, foreign trade and access to global markets: the most important aspects of economic development policies. 90% of trade is still carried out by sea, and this is where urban and transport policies come together. Port cities are now not only national platforms for commerce, but often also regional and international ones. The city-port dynamic must, therefore, reconcile the demands of balanced urban development with those of a logistics industry still looking to optimize transport flows in terms of time and expense. This sometimes leads to approaches that conflict with good use of space, and to the need to arbitrate these conflicts in favor of the aims of the city and the country as a whole. The World Bank, when it is able, advises its client countries and their port cities on how to best carry out this arbitration.

AIVP: Has the need for urban integration of ports, both spatial and functional, become an important criterion for the awarding of World Bank loans?

M.J: The Bank is keen to stress the importance of this spatial and functional integration, which sometimes requires the physical separation of urban and port traffic flows, but also often offers the opportunity to bring to light the complementarity of port and urban policies, particularly during port extension operations and the updating of economically obsolete infrastructure. As a result, when the Bank is approached in the context of an urban or port development project in a port city, our teams are careful to ensure that this interface, and the issues it can give rise to, are fully discussed.

AIVP: Which port city operations in receipt World Bank loans are, in your opinion, particularly symbolic in this regard? Why are they notable?

M.J: The Rijeka* project in Croatia is a recent example of a port operation which integrates opportunities both for urban redevelopment and for the enhancement of maritime heritage in coastal urban areas. More ambitious, perhaps, is the Port Cities Development Program Project for the Republic of Yemen which aimed to improve the investment climate whilst encouraging growth and job creation in the three port cities of Aden, Hodeidah and Mukalla. This program, spanning twelve years, started with small-scale investment in infrastructure, followed by the designing of City Development Strategies for each of the three port cities. Later came more specific projects, such as the First and Second Port Cities Development Projects of Yemen, which helped to implement the actions identified in the Development Strategies.

AIVP: The issue of “sustainable” and “livable” cities is on the World Bank’s agenda. In this context, what kind of initiatives do you think can be promoted in the area of city-port cooperation?

M.J: To make cities more economically efficient and more socially inclusive: this is the main aim in terms of development and the fight against poverty. This task should be seen within the larger framework that the World Bank defines as Green Growth for All. Cities in general, and port cities in particular, are important vehicles for economic growth. As ports are such key instruments for international trade, the cities that harbor them therefore find themselves at the forefront of global competition for access to new markets. International financial institutions, when assisting the port cities of their client countries, must ensure that the needs of ports in the international logistics chain are effectively balanced with the needs of cities striving for socially balanced development. This is the approach of the World Bank.

*The port and the city of Rijeka are active members of the AIVP.

15 January 2013

Industrial ecology, the port-city model

Kate RoystonThe presentations and debates on industrial ecology were among the most interesting areas of the 13th AIVP World Conferencein June 2012. The numerous projects in progress throughout the world, in Europe, China and Korea for example, show the level of interest in this new approach to development based on a circular economy which optimises the re-use of resources and promotes a carbon-free environment. At the heart of these new strategies, cooperation and mutualisation have been the key words of the AIVP message since its creation.

Read Kate Royston (MBA AIEMA, Robbee Smole – Sustainable Business Solutions)

9 November 2012

Obama Administration : “We Can’t Wait” Initiative, Five Major Port Projects

Last July 2012, President Obama, the context of his “We can’t Wait” policy initiated in the autumn of 2011, announced the acceleration of the launch procedures for 5 major port projects in the United States, projects concerning the port cities of Jacksonville, Miami, Savannah, New York and Charleston. The objective is a modernisation of the infrastructures with the aim to encourage American economic growth, notably by adapting the ports concerned to the largest size of vessels which will use the new Panama Canal.
This decision has been the subject of numerous reactions and comments as to the true state of the network of the maritime and waterway infrastructures in the USA, and to the financial effort which it would be necessary to engage in order to avoid a loss of competitiveness of the country’s economy, and to its consequences in terms of employment.
The challenge is thus a major one and it has therefore appeared interesting to us to give space to one of our members, in the person of Franc Pigna, Managing Director of Aegir Port Property Advisers, regarding this dossier. Present in the AIVP network since 2004, Franc Pigna was one of the speakers at the closing round table of the 13th World Conference of Cities and Ports. He gives us here his point of view, in a personal opinion.
In the future, if you also, as a member of AIVP, wish to react on the news from port cities and bring your own thoughts to bear on the themes supported by AIVP, please do not hesitate to contact us. This enhancement of our debates is the foundation of our action and will contribute to the vivacity and dynamic of our Association.

Opinion by Franc J Pigna, CRE, FRICS, CMC, Managing Director Aegir Port Property Advisers