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Urban Port

25 November 2020

Heritage as an asset

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The specific identity of our port cities comes mainly from their port heritage. Re-using that heritage to redevelop a site and enhance its appeal is a strategy that features regularly in our publications. Currently, some new examples have been seen. These include redeveloping warehouses and converting them for new uses, such as the Fénix Museum in Rotterdam or concert halls in Brussels. Also in the Belgian capital, the former Tour&Taxis ferry terminal which dates from the early 20th century is set to be turned into offices, shops and leisure facilities, housed in a sustainable building. These transformative projects are also an opportunity for architects to suggest ways of increasing urban density, by grafting new additions onto existing buildings. Examples include a former industrial mill in Dublin, and an old shipbuilding plant in Brisbane. Investors are often among the first to spot the potential offered by existing heritage, as shown with the buildings recently put up for sale at the listed Sullivans Cove site in Hobart (Tasmania).

 

 

 

25 November 2020

The winning design for the new passenger terminal in Valencia (Spain) has been announced

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The Port of Valencia has opted for the project proposed by Baleària. Due to be built on the site of a former shipyard, the sustainable terminal will be powered by renewable energy and will be 100% self-sufficient. It will also house a centre for innovation and eco-efficiency, along with a cultural space. The Mayor of Valencia has suggested creating a tunnel to access the terminal, in addition to a pedestrian and cycle route, as a way of reducing the building’s impact on the local landscape. The port has given the green light and is set to carry out a technical feasibility study.

Autoridad portuaria de Valencia ; El Diario

25 November 2020

The Port of Amsterdam official opens a sustainable, “circular” building using geothermal energy, solar power, specially chosen materials, …

Port of Amsterdam

25 November 2020

In Ghent (Belgium), a primary school and crèche are under construction at a disused port site

ArchDaily (+ images, plans)

18 November 2020

The port of Dublin: ever closer integration with the City

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The Port of Dublin has unveiled the Liffey-Tolka project, with plans for a 1.4 km dedicated cycle and pedestrian route between the river Liffey and the Tolka estuary, through Dublin port lands. It will bring cyclists and pedestrians from the Liffey to the start of a second Port-City integration project, the Tolka Estuary Greenway, a 3.2 km route along the northern perimeter of the port. These green links will provide safe thoroughfares while providing better views of the port and its activities, symbolising the commitment to Port-City integration highlighted by the Chief Executive of Dublin Port Company, Eamon O’Reilly. That commitment is also reflected in the masterplan for 2040, with plans for the Alexandra Dock area including the redevelopment of a former flour mill. It will house spaces to present the port archives and its current activities, two 300-seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.

Port of Dublin ; Liffey-Tolka project, Grafton Architects ; Flour Mill masterplan, Grafton Architects

18 November 2020

New governance for the Deux-Rives project in Strasbourg (France), with a new president and joint management by the SPL (publicly-owned local development corporation) and the SEM (public-private partnership)

Le Moniteur

18 November 2020

The City of El Puerto (Spain) looks to regain control of its river

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The Mayor of El Puerto and the President of the Port of Cadiz have together unveiled plans to redevelop the area along both banks of the Guadalete. The project includes a new riverside promenade running for 1.7 km along the right bank, which will be divided into ten zones designed to showcase the city’s identity, including traditional shipbuilding and wine. Information points, public stages for cultural events and performances, as well as new green spaces, landscaped areas and sports and leisure facilities will be available by 2022. Meanwhile on the left bank, water sports activities will be developed, and the fishing port will be integrated. The local population will be invited to participate in the projects.

La Voz de Cadiz ; Port of Cadiz Bay

18 November 2020

“The Factory”, a flexible cultural complex, is set to open in Manchester (UK) in 2021. Virtual tours have been available since July

Design boom (+ images) ; video 

18 November 2020

A new riverside park in the historic centre of Saint Petersburg (Russia) will connect the city’s green spaces via a continuous pedestrian promenade

Competition results ; Inhabitat (+ images)

11 November 2020

Boston looks to tackle climate change

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The recently opened public debate provided an opportunity to look at the various options and solutions for the different waterfront precincts, in response to the short, medium and long term challenges posed by rising sea levels and flooding caused by climate change. So-called “resilience” solutions discussed with residents and businesses in the districts affected include raising sections of the waterfront, and some roads and cycle lanes, raising existing public spaces or creating new ones, redeveloping the port promenade, and installing new coastal protection measures. Most of these solutions should be completed by 2030.

NorthEnd waterfront ; Final Report

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Citizen Port

25 November 2020

The fisherman’s wharf (Muelle Pescadores) of Bahía Blanca (Argentina) will be refurbished by the Port Authority to improve the working conditions of the fishing community and welcome visitors.

Puerto Bahía Blanca

25 November 2020

The port of Port of Trois-Rivières (Canada) supports local artists by acquiring the Hommage au Saint-Laurent collection of canvas artworks.

➜  Port Trois-Rivières

24 November 2020

How to improve the water quality while protecting the biodiversity?

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Water quality is one of the priorities in port cities and there are many ways to improve it. In the Balearic Islands (Spain), the Port has deployed an innovative system to collect marine waste that includes a catamaran powered by solar energy, a semi-rigid hybrid boat and a modern electric drone to reach the most inaccessible areas. Nature-based solutions are also possible, as it is visible in the port of Gothenburg (Sweden), where the port planted eelgrass beds. These serve as protection for several fish species, while at the same time help to improve water quality and protect beaches from erosion. It is also necessary to monitor closely the quality of the water for submarine species. One positive example of this is the port of Ceuta (Spain) that is promoting the Sentinel Stations project in the port area through marine biological indicators, such as microalgae, sedimentation or the concentration of micro-plastics.

Ports of Balears, SVT, Port of Ceuta

24 November 2020

Innovative mobility in port cities: logistics, waterbuses and bus stops

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French water transport is increasingly relevant in construction site logistics. Key stakeholders, including HAROPA and the municipality, are collaborating to promote river logistics for the Olympic Games of 2024 in Paris, including the construction of the Olympic village. In Strasbourg (France), 6 tonnes of paving stones have been delivered for the first time using barges and bicycles took place, reducing the impact of construction material logistics. Innovative logistics also concerns passengers, such as the new waterbuses in the Province of South Holland, since 6 will be hybrid and 3 electric. User’s experience is one of the key aspects in public transport, as it is clear in the new self-sufficient bus stops financed by port authority of Algeciras (Spain). The new canopies include solar panels to power the lighting and will allow the user to charge its phone while waiting for the bus.

➜ Ouvrages Olympiques 1, Ouvrages Olympiques 2, France 3, Damen, El Estrecho Digital

18 November 2020

Online debate about port city heritage organized by Venice Port

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In the framework of the European Project REMEMBER, the port of Venice is organizing an online event on the 24th of November at 10:00 (CET) entitled “Cultural heritage as a driver of port cities’ sustainable development”. This online talk, will include the intervention of the Special Commissioner of Venice Port, Mr Pino Musolino, UNESCO’s assistant director, Mr. Ernesto Ottone Ramírez; Prof. Carola Hein and AIVP’s International Project Manager José M P Sánchez to share ideas about Port Centers. The project REMEMBER is focused on making natural and cultural heritage a leverage for sustainable and more balanced territorial development. Several AIVP members are involved, including the ports of Venice, Trieste and Dubrovnik.

➜ Adrijotalks, REMEMBER

18 November 2020

National Institute of Social Services and Port Authority sign an agreement in Bahía Blanca (Argentina) to strength the bond of the elderly with the city and the port with new actions.

Facebook

18 November 2020

Solidarity in the Vieux Port of Montreal (Canada). The Port will help the homeless in the Grand Quai with shelter, meals and health service.

➜ La Presse

18 November 2020

The quest for innovation of the Port of Algeciras, member of AIVP, rewarded by a European prize

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The 2020 edition of the ESPO awards for social integration of ports focused on innovation strategies and capacity of ports to attract start-ups into its ecosystem. The online award ceremony took place last week, recognizing the good work done by the Port of Algeciras (Spain), particularly the “the Innovation Journey” project. This project is part of a broader innovation strategy that will help the port to exceed its traditional roles as a landlord, and turn it into a business and efficiency partner. It will contribute to the port-city relationship, by creating new jobs for the local population. This broader strategy is complemented with a physical facility that will include a Port Center.

The other 3 finalists were the Port of Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Puertos del Estado (Spain) and Port of Lisbon (Portugal), all AIVP members as well. Their projects included respectively the Prodock, an innovation hub focused on circular economy, the Ports 4.0 Fund, a national program to foster open innovation in the port-logistics ecosystem and the Ocean Campus, an ambitious plan for the waterfront creating an ecosystem of excellence in RD&I, bringing together researchers, entrepreneurs, main companies, academics and experts in the sea-related field.
AIVP was part of the jury evaluating the project, as it has been since the first edition of the award.

Port of Algeciras, ESPO

11 November 2020

Citizens invited to express their opinions in Saint-Malo (France). The region of Brittany is hosting a consultation process including physical meetings and online tools.

Bretagne

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Enterprise-driver Port

4 June 2013

Port of Los Angeles: energy management will give a competitive edge in the future

On 3 June 2013, the port launched its energy action plan. Reliability of supply, optimisation of consumption, lowering costs, reducing environmental impact, etc. – the object is to increase the port’s independence from the regional electricity industry and guarantee service quality under all circumstances. (photo © aivp)
Source : Port of Los Angeles

4 June 2013

Maputo and Transnet reach an agreement on reciprocal use of their facilities to help the rapid economic expansion of southern Africa

Source : www.iol.co.za

4 June 2013

Trade diversity, wind generation industries, the environment – the Port of Nantes Saint Nazaire is trumpeting its ambitions

Source : Le Marin

4 June 2013

The re-launch of French ports must be based on three pillars: logistics, industry and the importance of ports for development

Source : French Government (pdf)

4 June 2013

WORLD SYSTEMS, a new approach to maritime traffic in the development policies of port cities

In the context of research projects into the dynamics of port cities, AIVP would like to draw its active members’ attention to the World Systems project. This project, financed by the European Union to the tune of one and a half million euros, began in March 2013 and will go on for 5 years. The World Systems project is under the scientific responsibility of César Ducruet, CRNS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) researcher and member of AIVP’s network of experts.“The World Seastems project aims to map and to analyze the changing spatial pattern of the world economy across 300 years from a maritime perspective. It will exploit untapped vessel movement data on a world scale since 1734, date of the first publication of Lloyd’s List. Such data offer disaggregated information on weekly inter-port flows with detailed descriptions of vessels as well as their dates of departure and arrival at world’s ports. Despite the vital importance of maritime transport for economic development and international trade, no research has been done on the long-term evolution of the global maritime network. There are three main goals of the project.
First, it will map for the first time the spatial distribution of almost 300 years of maritime flows in a dynamic and interactive manner. A geomatics visualisation platform will also integrate advanced analytical tools to simplify the pattern of shipping routes and corridors, and to extract meaningful information from the original data, with both scientific and pedagogical outcomes. Second, the project will look at the topological and spatial structure of the global network of inter-port links with reference to graph theory, social network analysis, and complex networks. The global properties of the network can be compared with general models of networks, while the evolution of macroscopic measures will be explored in relation with wider structural and conjectural changes in the world system (e.g. conflicts, revolutions, crises, territorial reconfigurations) in terms of network expansion, shrinkage, concentration and polarization. Internally, the search for tightly connected substructures (i.e. clusters, communities of ports, économies-mondes) will focus on the emergence of world regions and regional integration processes. Finally, we will examine the co-evolution of maritime flows and urban/regional development and compare the growth trajectories of port and non-port cities based on their situation in the combined sea-land network.
In a multidisciplinary fashion, the project questions both the contribution and the resilience of port activities and shipping routes to the transformations of the world system and economy from the local level to the global level. It will provide novel results about world systems theory, network theory, and location theory. ”

César Ducruet

http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/107041_fr.html

 

4 June 2013

Cruise ships: What future for onshore power supply in Europe?

The question of onshore power supply for ships was debated specifically at a conference organised by the Cruise Europe association at Le Havre on 24 April 2013.The inclusion of this subject on the conference agenda shows how important it is in today’s cruise ship world, in the face of continued increases in fuel costs and environmental constraints. Also known in French as “courant de quai” and in English as “cold ironing” or “alternative marine power”, this technology seems more and more essential on quays, not only for cruise ships but also for cargo vessels.
The principle is fairly simple and seems to make sense. When the ship is alongside it does not produce power using its on-board generators but plugs into either the onshore power grid or a generator specially supplied by the port, generally powered by LNG or hydrogen. The electricity demand of a cruise ship is considerable, on average three times that of a container carrier. The issue is therefore particularly important for the cruise industry, the more so as ships berth for preference as near as possible to the historic centre of port-cities and calls are becoming ever more numerous, with several large units alongside simultaneously during the season!
The advantages seem obvious for the immediate urban environment and the cruise operators themselves: little or no air pollution, less noise, less overall pollution. However, connection to the local network is a delicate matter because of the amount of power required. There is a risk that consumption peaks may overload the network causing it to cut out! Whether an onshore generator or the local grid is used, the question of supply security must be considered. Abandoning the ship’s energy independence means that operators must have absolute faith in the onshore installations. How can the vessel anticipate power cuts, either for technical reasons or due to union action?
Although some shipping companies, such as Holland America Line, proclaim their confidence in this mode of power supply and are investing in the construction of pre-equipped vessels, particularly for operating on the American west coast, this is not yet the case in Europe. Speakers underlined the difficulties associated with differences in electricity tariffs between European countries. The technology is also already threatened by the introduction of new equipment to enable ships to operate with LNG. This type of fuel has not yet been generally accepted for cruise ships by either the public or industry professionals. There is considerable nervousness about having gas tanks under the passengers’ feet! Whatever happens, the European Commission is inclined to toughen regulations for anti-pollution rules in ports. Onshore power supply, LNG… cruise operators are going to have to adapt. One more reason for a fresh look at the power balance of these vessels. Considerable power savings can still be made, particularly in air-conditioning. It is one of the ways in which cruise ship operators can help with the global environment problem!

 

4 June 2013

Shanghai : un 3e terminal passagers pour faire face à la croissance du trafic croisière

Source : Sino Ship News

4 June 2013

Virtualisation of cruise terminal information systems in Venice

“Venezia Terminal Passageri” hopes that their investment will reduce considerably the risks associated with a breakdown in computer systems, which could potentially cause an interruption in services and a loss of data with disastrous consequences for the company.
Source: La Repubblica

31 May 2013

Alotau in Papua-New Guinea preparing to receive cruise ship calls

The Port of Alotau will be restructured by PNG Ports Corporation Limited (PNGPCL) between now and October to enable it to receive the first cruise ships operated by Carnival Australia, one of the biggest operators in the Australian market. This will make it the biggest cruise ship port in the country.
Source: PNG Ports Corporation