AIVP Recommendation

Over time, the development of urban, port or agricultural sites cause major changes to their original natural environments, resulting in significant artificialisation. In order to reconcile the expansion of port activities to as-yet unused spaces with the need to take account of their impact on biodiversity, a deliberate long-term strategy must be adopted in advance. In addition to their traditional role as developers, port authorities also have a part to play in this process, with wider responsibility as manager of the sites and spaces they occupy.

Riga (Latvia)

There are two protected nature areas within the territory occupied by the Port of Riga: Milestibas Island (Love Island), which is part of a Latvian national park (SeaSide Nature Park / Piejura nature park), and the Kremeri nature reserve, established in 1993 and awarded national importance status in 1999.

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Dublin (Ireland)

The Port of Dublin is located close to certain zones with high environmental importance, not just for Ireland but for Europe. In 2013, the Port of Dublin joined forces with BirdWatch Ireland and Dublin Bay Biosphere to launch a programme…

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Dunkirk (France)

In 2011, the Port of Dunkirk published a Natural Heritage Master Plan, which followed on from the survey of local biodiversity it had established previously.

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