Cruise are more than ever a crucial topic for the Port-City relationship

 Health and life quality 

The creation of a discussion group led by Venice Port Authority is an example but other forms of debate happen. In Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain), the 3rd edition of the “Welcome Cruceros!” meeting will take place, bringing together port, city and region to discuss the benefits of this activity. In Talcahuano (Chile), the cruise board of the BioBío Region organized a workshop gathering all relevant stakeholders, including the port authority, municipality and companies. One of the main topics was generating unforgettable experiences for the passenger and using cruises to bring port and city closer together. Finally, the Cruise Dialogue conference will take place next February in Cartagena de Indias (Colombia). Academics, industry and political leaders will discuss the balance between cruises expansion and port-city sustainable relationship. AIVP supports this event and will organize a round table.

La Vanguardia ; Cruise Dialogue 2030

North European ports committed to reduce air pollution and noise of docked vessels.

 Health and life quality 

In the past few days we have seen several initiatives following a similar trend: providing on-shore power to docked vessels to reduce emissions, mostly CO2, nitrogen and sulphur oxides, and noise, affecting the health of local citizens.
In Germany, the federal minister and coastal states have signed a memorandum including different measures to make shore-based power commercially viable. Among the measures are reducing levies and a program of subsidies to improve the port infrastructure. At the same time, the port of Tallinn, in Estonia, has announced that it will install shore power facilities to reduce the emissions and noise of docked vessels. The equipment will be ready by the end of the year, with further expansion in 2020. The port expects to save 120 tonnes of CO2 per ship per month. The Copenhagen Malmo Port has signed an agreement with ferry operator DFDS to establish a shore power facility in Copenhagen, to become operational in 2020.
A recent study from the European Environment Agency’s (EEA) shows that in 2016 air pollution caused over 400 000 premature deaths. The measure of these port cities are positive examples of the actions that can be taken to comply the AIVP Agenda 2030, “Improving living conditions for residents of port cities and protecting their health”.

EEA ; Port of Hamburg ; Port of Tallinn ; Copenhagen Malmö Port ; El Vigia ; Port of Stockholm

The Ocean Cleanup organization launched “the Interceptor”, an autonomous boat to tackle plastic pollution in rivers. Two prototypes are already working in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Klang (Malaysia)

The barge uses a floating barrier that guides the litter to a conveyor belt extracting the garbage from the water. The debris is distributed into six internal dumpsters with capacity up to 50 m3. When the barge is full, the local operators recibe a signal to collect it and take the garbage to a waste management facility. The barge includes several solar panels, making the system also energy neutral. This kind of solutions can considerably improve the water quality in many port cities, contributing to goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030.

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