Multimodality is key to port-city performance

 Mobility 

Fierce competition between port territories has always come down to onshore mobility issues. As a result, rail and river links are strategically important, since they are the only ways to transport goods to and from the port whilst respecting the public’s environmental concerns. The future European Transport Commissioner has made the issue a central policy plank, while there is also visible investment on the ground. Kiel (Germany) is developing the capacity to support 740 metre-long trains, while Long Beach (USA) is committed to expanding its main rail infrastructures. In Canada, the ports of Quebec and Halifax are making rail links to the centre of the country and the American Midwest a key component of efforts to develop container activity. In many cases, the choice for ports is a multimodal future, or no future at all.

NPI (European Policy)  / Port of Kiel / Port Strategy (Halifax) / Port Strategy (Quebec)

Offshore wind: port cities are not resting on their laurels!

 Energy transition and circular economy 

For the International Energy Agency, investments in offshore wind are set to reach 900 billion euros by 2040, with a 15-fold increase in generation capacity by 15. While Europe is leading the way, port cities all over the world are taking a proactive approach to the issue, including in the United States, despite the Trump administration’s reluctance. Not a week goes by without some major project or initiative being announced, at varying stages of advancement from one country to the next, or even from one port to the next, depending on the extent to which the industry has developed locally. Examples announced in recent days include the creation of logistics hubs in Connecticut (USA) and France, prototype installations in Spain, and energy conversion strategies in Japan

Le Marin 1 (IEA)  / IEA / Renews (Connecticut) / Le Marin 2 (Caen) / El Mercantil (Santander) / Inhabitat (Fukushima) / PVTech (Fukushima)