The Ocean Cleanup organization launched “the Interceptor”, an autonomous boat to tackle plastic pollution in rivers. Two prototypes are already working in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Klang (Malaysia)

The barge uses a floating barrier that guides the litter to a conveyor belt extracting the garbage from the water. The debris is distributed into six internal dumpsters with capacity up to 50 m3. When the barge is full, the local operators recibe a signal to collect it and take the garbage to a waste management facility. The barge includes several solar panels, making the system also energy neutral. This kind of solutions can considerably improve the water quality in many port cities, contributing to goal 9 of the AIVP Agenda 2030.

Continue reading

Hobart (Tasmania): a fifteen-year masterplan for the waterfront

The Hobart waterfront is already Tasmania’s most popular destination. TasPorts, which owns and operates the port, is keen to make the area even more attractive by restructuring part of the docks. Measures including replacing certain ageing buildings, creating a marina in an area currently home to fishing activities, additional berths for cruise vessels, and a new layout for existing berths. Anthony Donald, CEO of TasPorts, has announced that the process will be carried out in consultation with stakeholders.

Continue reading

Strasbourg wants to rely on river transport for more sustainable urban logistics.

Since May 2018, a terminal has been set up at the Quai des Pécheurs in the heart of the metropolis for the needs of a construction site. The City wants now to go further today and is calling for projects to make this terminal a platform for low-carbon urban logistics. The terminal shall operate on a daily basis in perfect harmony with other urban and tourist uses of the waterway. This project is part of the Strasbourg climate plan. Continue reading