Environment and climate: how far has the maritime and port sector progressed?

 Climate change 

Reducing carbon footprints, developing new energy sources, promoting multimodality, and electrifying installations are all areas in which ports have been taking responsibility for nearly ten years. AIVP provides you with regular updates on the latest developments in these areas, in which there is also a trend towards greater cooperation, with ten Nordic ports recently announcing initiatives to tackle the issues involved. At sea, with one month to go before the new IMO regulations come into force, things appear to be moving more slowly. In a recent report by the Global Maritime Forum, the maritime industry itself expressed concern about its preparedness for the new regulations, decarbonisation and the demands of civil society.

Flows / Global Maritime Forum / Report (pdf) / Ports of Stockholm / Port of Gothenburg

Urban planning: tackling flood risks from the design stage

 Climate change 

Hull is the second most at-risk city in the UK when it comes to flooding. A competition was launched to find ways of countering the risk in the planned redevelopment of Humber Quays West. The winning project, dubbed “Harper Perry”, proposes solutions to absorb and hold floor waters, before allowing them to drain off slowly via the promenades, amphitheatre-shaped public spaces, and parks. The competition site also shows the solutions suggested by the other candidates.

H-Living with water ; Harper Perry project

Can efforts to protect against rising sea levels be profitable?

 Climate change 

Developing the city on land reclaimed from the sea in anticipation of rising sea levels could be an opportunity to acquire new urban spaces and facilities. Several such projects have been launched, in Copenhagen, New York, Singapore, and Jakarta. This solution to the climate risk could even generate substantial profits from the sale of the new land and the facilities developed on it, unlike more traditional methods such as building protective embankments. But there is still debate, not just on this point, but also on the need to avoid compromising the quality of facilities made available to the public.

The Guardian

Shanghai waterfront: urban ecology and heritage

 Climate change 

A 2.7 kilometer stretch of public space has been developed along the Huangpu. The environment is a key priority for the project, which involves adopting low-carbon technology, re-using some of the existing vegetation, and deploying “spongy city” technologies to anticipate flood risks, etc. The area will house sports and leisure activities, along with urban art, and is taking advantage of the existing industrial heritage.

Shanghai Daily