Boston: climate-driven gentrification?

 Climate change 

We have previously mentioned, on a number of occasions, the strategy adopted by the city of Boston to tackle the issues of climate change and rising sea levels: instead of just building levees and seawalls, the city is focused on building with the natural environment, by creating parks, wetland areas, and so on, to mitigate the impact of flooding. However, urban development projects at these sites will also make them much more expensive, ensuring only wealthier people are able to live there – a fairly standard type of gentrification. But what of the existing communities in these places? Will they be forced to move? And will their new homes also be protected against the risks of flooding? It is this “climate-driven” gentrification that Boston’s chief of environment, energy and open space is keen to avoid.

The Guardian

A new kind of governance for heritage

 Governance 

The circular economy concept has gradually established itself. Could its ideas provide the inspiration for a “circular governance” approach to the re-use of urban cultural? That is the question being pondered by 16 cities of the European ICLEI network. The synthesis report on this project is now available. It identifies and illustrates how a new approach is possible, for re-using, funding and maintaining cultural heritage sustainably.

Iclei ; Synthesis Report

 

Innovative or traditional, all approaches are welcome for sustainable port cities

 Energy transition and circular economy 

Port cities around the globe are developing different projects to reduce the negative externalities of port activities. In Spain, the port of Valencia just received the government approval to build an electric substation with a capacity of 30 Megawatts, giving a first step towards its goal of becoming a carbon-free until 2030. Also in Spain, the port of Barcelona has launched a free sustainability consultancy service for its end costumers, helping them know the emissions of logistic chains and facilitate the decision making towards greener transportation. Other promising field of study is blue carbon, or the process by which marine plants capture carbon and transfer it into sediments. The port of Seattle (USA) will collaborate with Washington State departments to study the benefits of this procedure. Finally, another way to reduce the polluting emissions is to avoid them at all, supporting carbon-free transport, such as wit, like the port of Le Havre is doing in the project TOWT – Transport à la Voile.

Europa Press – Barcelona, El Periódico de la Energía – Valencia, Green Marine – Seattle, Twitter – Le Havre

Port Cities of San Antonio and Valparaíso show their commitment with local community

 Health and life quality 

Both leading Chilean ports have deployed several key actions in recent weeks to support workers, children and small business owners. As we saw in previous newsletters, drawing contests have been a popular measure to entertain children and keep the contact with the port. Almost 600 children participated in the competition organized by the port of Valparaíso with the local art museum. In a similar way, the port of San Antonio is inviting children aged 6-13 to participate in their competition “draw your port from home”, co-organized with the local newspaper. From a social perspective, both ports have extended their support during this crisis. They have continued with sanitation actions and helped port workers with food packages and vaccination campaigns. Additionally, the port of San Antonio also decided to significantly reduce the rent for local craftsmen with shops in the waterfront.

Radio Festival, Soy Chile, Soy Chile, Port Valparaíso, Soy Chile, Portal Portuario