From 2022, ships being repaired will also be a show in Hamburg (Germany)

 Culture and identity 

Measuring 209 m, “Dock 10” will be the biggest covered floating dock in Europe. Its walls and roof will be mostly transparent, allowing members of the public to see the repair work being carried out on ships docked there. The roof will enable workers to carry on with their work regardless of the weather conditions, while noise and exhaust gases should also be reduced.

NDR (+ video) ; Charterworld

Hydrogen in port cities: new project could save up to 1 million tons of CO2 per year

 Energy transition and circular economy 

The quest for new energy sources to replace fossil fuels is accelerating. Although many ports have already created the first systems for LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) for ships, many argue that hydrogen could be the ultimate solutions for the energy transition. The most recent project joining this chase has been announced in the port of Oostende (Belgium). A consortium formed by the port authority, DEME Concessions and PMV plans to build a new plant to produce green hydrogen using renewable energy. The plant would save between 500k and 1 million tons of CO2 per year. The project also includes an offshore wind farm including 399 turbines with a total capacity of 2,26 GW. Other port cities in Europe are also developing different initiatives in the same direction. The port of Antwerp, also in Belgium, already ordered tug boats and passengers ferry using hydrogen technology. Hamburg (Germany), announced last year its plans to build the world’s largest hydrogen electrolysis plant in port, with a capacity of 100 megawatts. The port of Valencia (Spain), is also active in this field, with the project H2PORT, including port equipment powered by hydrogen. However, we cannot forget there is no silver bullet for the energy transition. This ambitious goal will require diversifying our energy sources and optimizing our consumption.

Clean Energy Wire, Portal Portuario, Green Port, Port of Antwerp, Valencia Port

How can areas be made attractive while undergoing redevelopment?

 Port city interface 

We have reported regularly on projects being carried on Marseilles’ waterfront and city-port interface area. Urban redevelopment covering 310 hectares began in 1995, with an additional 170 hectares added in 2007. Projects of this scale are naturally carried out over a period of time. The challenge is to ensure that the areas concerned are attractive to residents and visitors, even before their redevelopment is complete. This is a commonly raised issue for many of you. To address it, Euroméditerranée, the body in charge of the waterfront redevelopment in Marseilles and a member of AIVP, launched “MOVE” in late 2018, an invitation for expressions of interest in four newly available sites. The aim was to use the sites as a testing ground for temporary projects developed on themes such as solidarity, economy, collaboration, culture or civic responsibility. A short list of 11 projects was drawn up. Following discussions, the list of projects was fine-tuned, and some were merged together. Ultimately, four projects were selected. All will be installed in consultation with Euroméditérranée, and will remain in place for between one and four years. This is a fascinating temporary initiative designed to provide residents with a high-quality city-port interface, and we will be monitoring it closely.

MOVE, dossier de presse ; Video

The sustainable port is both smart and collective

 Governance 

The CEOs of the ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam have laid out converging visions for the future development of their respective ports, one having just returned from the World Economic Forum, the other speaking about in an interview about forward-looking prospect for the port. Both agree that the fight against climate change and the need for a carbon-neutral port economy are absolutely crucial. Technological innovation, both onshore and offshore, and moves to optimise logistics chains, will of course form part of the solution. Beyond that, however, the success of these changes will depend on the ability of ports to forge new partnerships and work collectively, by bringing their communities together around a shared process of transformation.
Port of Rotterdam / Flows