AIVP Recommendation

Examples of urban amenities on the water, such as floating restaurants, floating cinemas, housing boats, etc., are now permanent fixtures of many port cities. In many cases, these amenities are located on reconverted port sites now dedicated to urban functions, which nevertheless retain a definite maritime air. By increasing the number of anchorage points within the port and allowing them to be mobile again, they will help reconnect the city to its port and breathe new life into the waterfront. But this migration of urban functions onto the water is also an opportunity to preserve sometimes scarce or limited land space.

London (UK)

Denizen Works has designed a floating church for the diocese of London. The building will be able to travel along the canals to…

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Vejle (Denmark)

The Vejle Harbour development project will host a marina and the new head offices of Kirk Kapital, as well as Harbour Island, a man-made island on which twelve office and residential buildings are to be built.

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Copenhagen (Denmark)

Construction of « Kalvebod Waves » – designed by JDS Architects – started in 2012. This sector of the waterfront will offer a broad range of public spaces, recreational areas, and pedestrian promenades.

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Rotterdam (Netherlands)

The « floating pavilion » is located between Katendrecht and Kop van Zuid. It consists of 3 connected semi-spheres anchored in the old port of this Dutch city. The pavilion is 12 metres high and is used as an exposition and reception area.

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